Search found 31 matches

by D Ryan Lowe
November 12th, 2013, 3:18 pm
Forum: Word Meanings
Topic: Θεός
Replies: 11
Views: 2227

Re: Θεός

With a little help from my fiends (Sounds Beatle-ish in my ears.) I've learned that evidently Harris got the idea that θεός was originally a predicative term from TDNT A. The Greek Concept of God. 1. θεός in the Usage of Secular Gk. The question of the etym. of θεός has never been solved. It can th...
by D Ryan Lowe
November 4th, 2013, 2:38 am
Forum: Word Meanings
Topic: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11
Replies: 24
Views: 3567

Re: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11

Skepticism is perhaps warranted, but I would prefer skepticism to be backed up with an argument against it, or an alternate proposal for the difference in meaning for the three cases for επι. Well, I'm still skeptical. The cases don't have the syntactic functions you're proposing for them in this c...
by D Ryan Lowe
November 3rd, 2013, 2:56 am
Forum: Word Meanings
Topic: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11
Replies: 24
Views: 3567

Re: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11

My tentative hypothesis on επι is: επι + genitive groups the prepositional phrase within the noun phrase, i.e. "[ The fool on the hill ] is speaking perfectly loud." επι + dative makes the prepositional phrase incidental to the clause and the verb, sometimes like an indirect object, i.e. "The schol...
by D Ryan Lowe
November 1st, 2013, 1:43 pm
Forum: Word Meanings
Topic: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11
Replies: 24
Views: 3567

Re: επι - Matt 14:14, 15:32; 4:6, 14:11

Reviving this dead thread at David's request. My tentative hypothesis on επι is: επι + genitive groups the prepositional phrase within the noun phrase, i.e. "[ The fool on the hill ] is speaking perfectly loud." επι + dative makes the prepositional phrase incidental to the clause and the verb, somet...
by D Ryan Lowe
November 1st, 2013, 1:12 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?
Replies: 7
Views: 2412

Re: ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?

Ryan, last year I asked a very similar question in http://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=1379, and on the second page I provided a table for some instances based on my own judgement, which you may or may not find helpful in looking for the cases you want and other rarer cases. I ...
by D Ryan Lowe
October 31st, 2013, 9:05 pm
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?
Replies: 7
Views: 2412

Re: ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?

Constructions of ἐπὶ with the genitive most commonly involve the "partitive" genitive and indicate the spatial surface or the temporal range within which the predication is offered; constructions of ἐπὶ with the dative most commonly involve the "locative" dative and indicate the point in space or t...
by D Ryan Lowe
October 30th, 2013, 12:29 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?
Replies: 7
Views: 2412

ἐπὶ + G, D, or A?

Does anyone know of a good resource that distinguishes the uses of ἐπὶ with the genitive, dative, and accusative case? There are frequent uses of all of them, but I've checked Wallace's Grammar and Murray Harris' work on prepositions, and neither of them draw much of any sort of distinctions between...
by D Ryan Lowe
October 27th, 2013, 2:49 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Word breaks
Replies: 3
Views: 493

Re: Word breaks

Stephen Carlson wrote:It's possible, but fairly rare. I don't have any specific examples off the top of my head, but one case may involve οἶδα μὲν ... and οἴδαμεν ..., if I recall correctly.
Ah, good call. That's a textual variant for Romans 7:14.
by D Ryan Lowe
October 25th, 2013, 6:52 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Word breaks
Replies: 3
Views: 493

Word breaks

Since there were no word breaks in the early NT manuscripts, are there any texts in the New Testament where the placement of word breaks are disputed?
by D Ryan Lowe
October 9th, 2013, 4:48 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: James 2:18: my works, my faith, or both?
Replies: 40
Views: 3565

Re: James 2:18: my works, my faith, or both?

Actually, I think Levinsohn doesn't apply this rule to Jas. 2:18 because he doesn't consider κἀγώ to be a focal constituent; rather, it's a point of departure. I don't think Levinsohn ever applies the rule regarding points of departure. That's probably right, but an adverbial καί is usually a focus...