Search found 15 matches

by Rob Campanaro
February 28th, 2019, 4:47 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule
Replies: 9
Views: 1670

Re: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule

Excellent! Thank you, Steven. I was almost certain that ζωή should be taken as a personal noun given its referent. I'm curious as to why Wallace omitted the passage from the list in his article. Perhaps it was a simple oversight as I suggested earlier. And if I'm not transgressing forum policy, I wo...
by Rob Campanaro
February 28th, 2019, 12:31 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule
Replies: 9
Views: 1670

Re: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule

Thank you to everyone for your input. Further research reveals that the exact number of GS constructions in the New Testament is not universally agreed upon. In his grammar, Wallace indicates this in a footnote* citing the inclusion of impersonal nouns as a factor. It may be the case that at the end...
by Rob Campanaro
February 27th, 2019, 3:50 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule
Replies: 9
Views: 1670

1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule

1 John 5:20 reads: οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ ἀληθινὸς θεὸς καὶ ζωὴ αἰώνιος Is this not a valid Granville Sharp construction? The reason I ask is that in an article "Sharp Redivivus? - A Reexamination of the Granville Sharp Rule”, Danial Wallace provides a complete list of every GS construction in the New Testam...
by Rob Campanaro
February 21st, 2017, 7:23 am
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: ει μη and εαν μη
Replies: 5
Views: 6180

Re: ει μη and εαν μη

Thanks for the replies, they're much appreciated. I guess my next question would be, are all sentences containing either phrase always conditional? We usually translate them as introducing an exception where something is implicitly affirmed. For instance, Matthew 11:27: "οὐδεὶς ἐπιγινώσκει τὸν υἱὸν ...
by Rob Campanaro
February 18th, 2017, 2:01 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: ει μη and εαν μη
Replies: 5
Views: 6180

ει μη and εαν μη

Can anyone tell me if there is a substantive difference between "ει μη" and "εαν μη." BDAG, for the most part, seems to treat them as semantic equivalents.

Thanks.
by Rob Campanaro
February 28th, 2015, 8:39 am
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: Articular Abstract Nouns
Replies: 12
Views: 3657

Re: Articular Abstract Nouns

Stephen Hughes wrote: It is still a generation (of users / scholars) too early to determine whether Wallace (in relation to his well-known grammar) is ahead of himself or ahead of his time.
Well said.
by Rob Campanaro
February 27th, 2015, 8:15 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: Articular Abstract Nouns
Replies: 12
Views: 3657

Re: Articular Abstract Nouns

A superlative is basically an adjective or adverb that is the best in its class. Of course we're talking about nouns, but since abstracts focus on qualities, when the article falls under the par excellence category, they're able to carry a "superlative idea." Wallace states it this way: "...the arti...
by Rob Campanaro
February 26th, 2015, 7:33 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: Articular Abstract Nouns
Replies: 12
Views: 3657

Re: Articular Abstract Nouns

First, just so we're clear, I'm not advocating a particular view, but simply asking a question about statements in Wallace's grammar as they relate to anarthrous abstract nouns. With that in mind, the word κοπος is a perfect example of what I'm asking about. In all the examples you gave where the no...
by Rob Campanaro
February 24th, 2015, 10:47 am
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: Articular Abstract Nouns
Replies: 12
Views: 3657

Re: Articular Abstract Nouns

Stephen, the type of nouns Wallace deals with and the ones I'm primarily asking about are those whose abstractness are not in question. The following is a representative list: ἀνομία, σωτηρία, σοφίᾳ, ἀγάπη, πονηρόν, ἀγαθός, προσευχή, χάρις, ἀλήθεια, ἀδικία, ἐλευθερία, πίστις, κόπος. The majority of ...
by Rob Campanaro
February 22nd, 2015, 6:53 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: Articular Abstract Nouns
Replies: 12
Views: 3657

Re: Articular Abstract Nouns

Wes, thank you for the reply, it was indeed helpful. I'm just curious as to what formed the basis for the statements about the articular abstracts if they don't appear to have much if any support from the rest of the scholarly community. Michael, thank you as well for your input. Perhaps the phrase ...

Go to advanced search