Search found 1794 matches

by cwconrad
April 2nd, 2018, 6:25 am
Forum: Other
Topic: episthmh root
Replies: 9
Views: 1656

Re: episthmh root

Stephen Carlson wrote:
April 1st, 2018, 8:10 pm
πίστις is related to πείθομαι.
ἐπιστήμη is related to ἐπίσταμαι, which itself appears to be very old compound of the forebears of ἐπί and ἵστημι.
That is to say: the compound is so old that that it is deemed integral; it is the ἐ of ἐπι-that is augmented: imp. ἠπιστάμην.
by cwconrad
February 17th, 2018, 6:24 am
Forum: New Testament
Topic: ἐφοβήθησαν φόβον μέγαν
Replies: 8
Views: 1349

Re: ἐφοβήθησαν φόβον μέγαν

Yes, I remember that we used oo bandy names like "cognate accusative" for expressions of this sort. I've always thought these were better understood as "adverbial" accusatives -- accusatives used to add specificity to the verb in question. Perhaps Wallace has some special name for this accusative us...
by cwconrad
November 5th, 2017, 7:27 am
Forum: Seen on the Web
Topic: The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English
Replies: 7
Views: 1257

Re: The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English

For my part, I like "complicated." It suggests the overtones of Horace's Latin epithet ( duplex Ulixes without tilting definitely in that direction. This is, after all, the man who lies to Athena immediately upon his return to Ithaca and forces the rugged swineherd Eumaeus to come only to slow reco...
by cwconrad
November 3rd, 2017, 4:41 pm
Forum: Seen on the Web
Topic: The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English
Replies: 7
Views: 1257

Re: The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English

For my part, I like "complicated." It suggests the overtones of Horace's Latin epithet ( duplex Ulixes without tilting definitely in that direction. This is, after all, the man who lies to Athena immediately upon his return to Ithaca and forces the rugged swineherd Eumaeus to come only to slow recog...
by cwconrad
November 3rd, 2017, 8:32 am
Forum: Seen on the Web
Topic: The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English
Replies: 7
Views: 1257

The First Woman to Translate the ‘Odyssey’ Into English

A fascinating essay in tomorrow's NYT Magazine offers an account of Emily Wilson's new verse translation of the Odyssey of Homer, the first ever by a woman, including, among other things, the tough nut of how to translate the chief epithet for Odysseus, πολύτροπος, and translation as a perilous reli...
by cwconrad
October 21st, 2017, 11:51 am
Forum: Other
Topic: Poetry
Replies: 2
Views: 731

Re: Poetry

Last couple of days I've been looking at Agamemnon's address to his daughter Iphigenia Aulidensis 1255-1275. It isn't terribly difficult. The syntax makes sense if you stare at it long enough. Wondering what it would have been like for Euripides to translate Lawrence Ferlinghetti's Autobiography (1...
by cwconrad
August 5th, 2017, 8:08 am
Forum: Word Meanings
Topic: ἰάομαι Why middle?
Replies: 8
Views: 1923

Re: ἰάομαι Why middle?

Apart from the direct question regarding why this verb is middle, there is a question of what explanation is really likely to be convincing. My own thinking is that ῦὰσθαι involves the deliberate exercise of a power within the command of the subject. It is comparable to ἐργάζεσθαι or even δύνασθαι.I...
by cwconrad
July 28th, 2017, 7:04 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: τι and Context
Replies: 1
Views: 735

Re: τι and Context

Τι ακουσομεν του διδασκαλου; The above sentence in Duff's textbook is translated by Duff as, "Why should we listen to the teacher?" But, stripped of context, couldn't the sentence also be translated as, "What should we listen to from the teacher?" Given that the sentence has no context, could it be...
by cwconrad
June 10th, 2017, 11:22 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Theophilus of Antioch
Replies: 3
Views: 828

Re: Theophilus of Antioch

Can anyone what Theophilus means by this text: Ὅπως δὲ καὶ ἡ πλάσις δειχθῇ, πρὸς τὸ μὴ δοκεῖν εἶναι ζήτημα ἐν ἀνθρώποις ἀνεύρετον, (Theophilus of Antioch, Ad Autolycum, 2. 19. 13-14) But that the creation of man might be made plain, so that there should not seem to be an insoluble problem existing ...
by cwconrad
April 23rd, 2017, 11:08 am
Forum: Syntax and Grammar
Topic: Which kind of Accusative ὑπηκόους γινομένους
Replies: 5
Views: 951

Re: Which kind of Accusative ὑπηκόους γινομένους

This is what's called an "anacoluthon," that is, a construction that is often somewhat lengthy, the sequential segments of which do not cohere properly. When I learned my English grammar, we were taught to call them "run-on sentences." They result from giving voice -- or continuing to write --string...