Search found 17 matches

by Sean Ingham
April 14th, 2016, 5:08 pm
Forum: Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha
Topic: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath
Replies: 11
Views: 4286

Re: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redp

Thanks for all your help, Ken. Much appreciated. Chasing up on your last post I contemplated that the form nazaraias had the appearance of a Grecified form of the Latin for Nazirite, nazaraeus , as seen both in the Vulgate and Tertullian. That puts the Coilinianus form in the too hard to handle bask...
by Sean Ingham
April 13th, 2016, 10:11 am
Forum: Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha
Topic: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath
Replies: 11
Views: 4286

Re: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redp

The key is Field's Hexapla, which reads at Leviticus 25:5 This along with Jonathan Robie's link clarified the evidentiary weight of the reading. Codd. X, Lips. got me to two manuscripts, the former is a 6th-7th C. manuscript in the Fonds Coislin Greek collection, the latter, a 1767 print of an 11th...
by Sean Ingham
April 12th, 2016, 2:38 pm
Forum: Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha
Topic: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath
Replies: 11
Views: 4286

Re: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redp

Ah, that's Ἄλλος. The source of this alternative reading is not given. It's in the scholia according to Nobilius. Oh dear. One just has to know the source some other way? The particular example that I was interested in was from Lev 25:5 (ναζαραιος). Would such items marked "Al." tend to be Mediaeva...
by Sean Ingham
April 12th, 2016, 12:50 pm
Forum: Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha
Topic: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath
Replies: 11
Views: 4286

Re: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redp

Ken M. Penner wrote:Could you post an image of the entry?
Here's an example with some context for help. This is a hapax legomenon found only in Al.

Image
by Sean Ingham
April 12th, 2016, 9:47 am
Forum: Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha
Topic: Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath
Replies: 11
Views: 4286

Abbreviation for the name of a translation in Hatch&Redpath

Hopefully someone can help with a short issue: I have a note from Hatch & Redpath which contains an abbreviation for a Greek translation, "Al." (small "el") It is used with the same apparatus markers as Aq = Aquila, Sm = Symmachus & Th = Theodotion, but I come up with a blank for "Al." I found a str...
by Sean Ingham
August 6th, 2011, 2:56 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship
Replies: 44
Views: 11552

Re: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship

So you are proffering two layers of linguistic mystification here. One, that αδελφος does mean"brother of the flesh" and that you can somehow know that Gal 1:19 refers to Jesus and not to God in the non-titular use of κυριος. What you offer in your defence is that Jesus did have a brother named Jam...
by Sean Ingham
August 6th, 2011, 2:23 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship
Replies: 44
Views: 11552

Re: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship

I do not think your example is valid because "children of God" naturally excludes relationship in flesh, which is what I meant by the context excluding unlikely possibilities. That does not necessarily occur with "son of Y" where "Y" is a human. This complaint only works if you assume that του κυρι...
by Sean Ingham
August 6th, 2011, 1:27 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship
Replies: 44
Views: 11552

Re: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship

My translation was perfectly "literal." We have the Saxon genitive in English, and it's a natural part of the language. Crosses cannot have brothers. However, lords can. There's a difference in how you're perceiving this. It seems that you're coming to the text with the idea that Jesus didn't have ...
by Sean Ingham
August 6th, 2011, 11:28 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship
Replies: 44
Views: 11552

Re: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship

As an aside, ...ἕτερον δὲ τῶν ἀποστόλων οὐκ εἶδον, εἰ μὴ Ἰάκωβον τὸν ἀδελφὸν τοῦ κυρίου ( but I saw none of the other apostles, except James, the Lord's brother ... Using this translation will influence your approach to reading what Paul actually said. There is a subtle but significant difference b...
by Sean Ingham
August 6th, 2011, 10:48 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Differentiating fictive and biological kinship
Replies: 44
Views: 11552

Titular and non-titular κυριος

It really is a strange conversion. I mean, the Gospels state clearly that Jesus had brothers (Matthew 12:46; 13:55; Mark 3:31; Luke 8:19; John 7:3). The phrase τον αδελφον του κυριου says nothing about Jesus. That's why it's strange. You think it's strange that the NT would say κύριος instead of Ἰη...

Go to advanced search