Search found 72 matches

by Mike Burke
May 2nd, 2014, 12:40 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: Present Passive Imperative
Replies: 13
Views: 3845

Re: Present Passive Imperative

I want to construct a sentence using βλασφημείσθω without a negative adverb (if it can be sensibly used without one.) if a subject is implied in βλασφημείσθω, I believe "βλασφημείσθω Καίσαρας" is a complete sentence (Ceasar being the object.) The Ceasar could be a monster like Nero, a fairlly good E...
by Mike Burke
May 1st, 2014, 11:50 pm
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: Present Passive Imperative
Replies: 13
Views: 3845

Re: Present Passive Imperative

I wasn't asking about verse 17, or even verse 16. I merely mentioned that verse 16 is the only context I've seen βλασφημείσθω used in. (It's not used at all in verse 17.) What I was asking is if the word βλασφημείσθω has any meaning without being attached to a negative adverb (as it is in Romans 14:...
by Mike Burke
May 1st, 2014, 8:04 pm
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: Present Passive Imperative
Replies: 13
Views: 3845

Re: Present Passive Imperative

Context(s)? Also, some of these glosses (e.g., "let be supposing") don't seem to be proper English. Understanding the third person imperative is based on the social (power) relationship between the person being spoken to and the person who is expected to actually do something. Meanings can range fr...
by Mike Burke
April 30th, 2014, 4:36 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: Present Passive Imperative
Replies: 13
Views: 3845

Re: Present Passive Imperative

And would καυχάσθω be "let him boast," "let boast," or "let be boasting"?
by Mike Burke
April 30th, 2014, 3:56 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: Present Passive Imperative
Replies: 13
Views: 3845

Present Passive Imperative

Would βλασφημείσθω be "let evil be spoken of," or "let be spoken of as evil"?

And would οἰέσθω be "let suppose," or "let be supposing"?
by Mike Burke
March 27th, 2014, 4:15 pm
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: βλασφημείσθω
Replies: 25
Views: 6747

Re: βλασφημείσθω

I think he's just asking whether βλασφημέω implies that the charges are false or not. Seems like a reasonable question to me. If it is really such a simply question that is reasonable, yes. The answer to that is evident from the general contexts in which the word is used... Wouldn't the context of ...
by Mike Burke
March 27th, 2014, 3:04 pm
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: βλασφημείσθω
Replies: 25
Views: 6747

Re: A few useful antonym pairs to help you understand βλασφη

When used of people, does the word itself imply that the evil spoken (of some person) is false? That's a really good question... At your pre-beginner level, questions about synonymity and nuance are really not useful for your overall progress in the language. I would like to encourage you again to ...
by Mike Burke
March 27th, 2014, 1:42 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: βλασφημείσθω
Replies: 25
Views: 6747

Re: βλασφημείσθω

P.S. I would have downloaded the Greek text sooner, but I didn't see that little button up top, and I didn't know how.

Thank you Mr. Jones.
by Mike Burke
March 27th, 2014, 1:05 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: βλασφημείσθω
Replies: 25
Views: 6747

Re: βλασφημείσθω

Hi again Mike, I think you're doing just fine... Thank you. The first time I looked at that quote from Demosthenes, I didn't see any Greek text, and I made some assumptions. I just downloaded the Greek text, and it still seems that my basic assumption was right (that the word under discussion here,...
by Mike Burke
March 27th, 2014, 12:11 am
Forum: Beginners Forum
Topic: βλασφημείσθω
Replies: 25
Views: 6747

Re: βλασφημείσθω

The quote from Demosthenes would seem to inicate that the word itself doesn't imply that the evil spoken is untrue. Surely it would have been right and proper, men of Athens, that those who claim to receive a crown from you, should show that they are worthy of it, and not speak ill of me. But since ...

Go to advanced search