Search found 3119 matches

by Jonathan Robie
December 2nd, 2018, 6:52 pm
Forum: Greek Language and Linguistics
Topic: New Linguistic Theories to learn
Replies: 13
Views: 1107

Re: New Linguistic Theories to learn

On a semi-related note, at some point I am going to have to take the dive down the rabbit hole and start reading work on second language acquisition. Has anyone else found this a benefit for teaching introductory Greek? Absolutely. In particular, I have benefited from SIOP and ESL/SSL, learning mos...
by Jonathan Robie
December 2nd, 2018, 6:49 pm
Forum: Introductions
Topic: Victor Gavino intro
Replies: 3
Views: 458

Re: Victor Gavino intro

Welcome, Victor - and welcome Father Beya, perhaps you could also introduce yourself?
by Jonathan Robie
November 22nd, 2018, 3:01 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: Is ὑπὸ with an inanimate object unusual?
Replies: 2
Views: 254

Re: Is ὑπὸ with an inanimate object unusual?

It happens frequently enough that Danker thought it deserved its own sense. Here are the references he gave in your quote above (click on the link for a list of verses in Greek and English): Mt 8:24; Mt 11:7; Mt 14:24; Lk 7:24; Lk 8:14; Ac 27:41; Ro 3:21; Ro 12:21; 1 Cor 10:29; 2 Cor 5:4; Col 2:18; ...
by Jonathan Robie
November 14th, 2018, 9:49 am
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Can a genitive be both objective and subjective?
Replies: 4
Views: 481

Re: Can a genitive be both objective and subjective?

I think this is one of those times where each interpretation makes good theological sense, but these are two different interpretations of the same sentence, with different grammatical roles.
by Jonathan Robie
November 13th, 2018, 12:35 pm
Forum: Grammar Questions
Topic: Can a genitive be both objective and subjective?
Replies: 4
Views: 481

Re: Can a genitive be both objective and subjective?

Hmmmm, so the possibilities would be: The things that Christ taught The things that were taught about Christ Both? If I understand correctly, the original post asks if it can mean both the things that Christ taught and the things that were taught about Christ. The teachings that belong to Christ (Ba...
by Jonathan Robie
November 12th, 2018, 9:50 pm
Forum: Projects
Topic: Collation format
Replies: 10
Views: 759

Re: Collation format

Alan Bunning wrote:
November 12th, 2018, 8:59 pm
... because people will probably want the OT to be covered as well.
I'm a person, and I think this is true.
by Jonathan Robie
November 12th, 2018, 10:54 am
Forum: Projects
Topic: Collation format
Replies: 10
Views: 759

Re: Collation format

Eventually, someone finds a new manuscript that requires a new slot, which needs a new identifier. Using GUIDs means you can always create a new one. Using a short GUID probably requires some thinking to make sure that a new GUID is unique. Or perhaps you simply discard it if it is not unique. Usin...
by Jonathan Robie
November 12th, 2018, 10:53 am
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: Is κατ’ ὄνομα in 3 John 1:14/15 an idiom?
Replies: 5
Views: 336

Re: Is κατ’ ὄνομα in 3 John 1:14/15 an idiom?

"individually" brings that scenario to mind which seems very nice but sort of over the top for a greeting: "Joel, the elder sends his greetings" "Abe, the elder sends his greetings" "Micah, ..." I don't know how large the group was or what the custom was. I had pictured this not as a formal announc...
by Jonathan Robie
November 12th, 2018, 10:47 am
Forum: Projects
Topic: Collation format
Replies: 10
Views: 759

Re: Collation format

Secondly, will there never be cases where it is ambiguous as to which "Slot ID" a particular word should be allocated to? Not in any significant way. With a fragmentary text, for example, you might have a fragment where the last visible word is και and there could be a variant there with “και blah ...
by Jonathan Robie
November 10th, 2018, 7:32 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: Is κατ’ ὄνομα in 3 John 1:14/15 an idiom?
Replies: 5
Views: 336

Re: Is κατ’ ὄνομα in 3 John 1:14/15 an idiom?

I think this is the distributive sense of κατά - each one, one at a time. In context, greet each one individually.

It's like κατὰ πόλιν, which is used to mean "from one town to another". There's a really interesting example of this in 1 Cor 14:27: εἴτε γλώσσῃ τις λαλεῖ, κατὰ δύο ἢ τὸ πλεῖστον τρεῖς.