Search found 961 matches

by MAubrey
April 9th, 2019, 2:28 pm
Forum: Koine Greek Texts
Topic: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities
Replies: 25
Views: 5329

Re: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities

Here is an example where the verb is fronted in it's clause: εἰσὶν δὲ ἐξειλεγμένοι Περσῶν οἱ ἄριστοι δόξαντες ἐν ἡλικίᾳ τέτταρες... This is close to what we're looking for, but I'm not sure how the δὲ and participle would affect things. Here's an example using the demonstrative: ἔπειτά εἰσιν οὗτοι ...
by MAubrey
April 9th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Forum: Koine Greek Texts
Topic: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities
Replies: 25
Views: 5329

Re: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities

The so-called "sentence accent" can also be for a Topicalization, Contextualization and thus non-Focal. So I find "sentence accent" unhelpful by itself. (See my comments immediately above.) Clitics are phonological and prosodic phenomenon, if you're going to account for them without talking about p...
by MAubrey
April 8th, 2019, 8:52 pm
Forum: Koine Greek Texts
Topic: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities
Replies: 25
Views: 5329

Re: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities

Hyperbaton? Is this how you'd label what's going on in the attached image? (Not meaning to distract here... please be forgiving.) If not, do you know of a name for fronting the PN in such a way? οὗτοί εἰσιν υἱοὶ θεοῦ οὗτοι υἱοί εἰσιν θεοῦ εἴσιν οὗτοι υἱοὶ θεοῦ οὗτοι υἱοὶ θεοῦ εἰσίν Any pointers as ...
by MAubrey
March 31st, 2019, 7:42 pm
Forum: Koine Greek Texts
Topic: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities
Replies: 25
Views: 5329

Re: Syntax in Josephus Antiquities

These patterns are in the NT as well, just less common. Quantifier-Article-PP-N is very normal. There isn't a name for this above. But this: Modifier [VERB] Noun Is called hyperbaton. It's a means of structuring in the information flow in a particular manner. It happens in the NT, but becomes more a...
by MAubrey
March 31st, 2019, 4:06 pm
Forum: Vocabulary
Topic: Πείθω in the perfect - Active form, passive sense?
Replies: 2
Views: 1159

Re: Πείθω in the perfect - Active form, passive sense?

I have noticed that in the NT, the instances of Πείθω in the perfect (24x out of 53) are some times passive in meaning ("having been persuaded"), but active in form. Some instances are Romans 2:19, "If you are persuaded (πέποιθάς) that you are a guide to the blind", and Philippians 1:25, "Having be...
by MAubrey
March 28th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: Hebrews 2,10 - meaning of the Aorist participle
Replies: 9
Views: 2227

Re: Hebrews 2,10 - meaning of the Aorist participle

Participles don't specify sequentiality one way or the other. While aorists are used for event sequencing, but that's an indicative thing that isn't at play in the non-finite forms. I don't think "modal' is the right word for "in bringing." My sense is that particular translation of the participle i...
by MAubrey
March 17th, 2019, 1:55 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: In Hebrews 10:13 what is the effect of the subjunctive?
Replies: 2
Views: 1295

Re: In Hebrews 10:13 what is the effect of the subjunctive?

Per BDAG, ἔως takes an aorist subjunctive when the commencement of the event is contingent upon circumstances.

[edit: Looks like Barry beat me by two minutes.]
by MAubrey
March 9th, 2019, 5:35 pm
Forum: What does this text mean?
Topic: In Romans 11:15 who is doing the refusing/accepting?
Replies: 3
Views: 1619

Re: In Romans 11:15 who is doing the refusing/accepting?

I think your sudden realization is correct, but I don't think it's a Greek issue. Thank you. My concern is mostly the "αὐτῶν", whether the combination with a noun results in "their refusing" or "their being refused". Which is the normal koine usage? I'm afraid that, here, there is no normal usage, ...
by MAubrey
February 28th, 2019, 5:00 pm
Forum: New Testament
Topic: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule
Replies: 9
Views: 2615

Re: 1 John 5:20 and the Granville Sharp Rule

IIRC, Wallace requires both noun to denote a person, but in 1 John 5:20 the second noun is ζωή "life." Since it's a predicating construction, ζωή would have a person has a referent. Is that how Wallace reasons? I can't remember. I haven't looked at the book in at least five years. It's how I would ...

Go to advanced search