Terminology

Biblical Greek morphology and syntax, aspect, linguistics, discourse analysis, and related topics

Terminology

Postby Barry Hofstetter » February 17th, 2014, 10:21 am

Is there a technical term for an ending that can refer to more than one thing? "Single termination" is what I remember a Greek professor of yore using, but is there something more sophistykated sounding? :) For example, -ῳ as a dative singular can be either masculine or neuter. How do we say that? Bi-gender (not transgender, please!)?
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Barry Hofstetter
 
Posts: 640
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Terminology

Postby Stephen Carlson » February 17th, 2014, 11:02 am

The usual term I've heard is syncretic.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke, New Testament)
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1978
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Terminology

Postby cwconrad » February 17th, 2014, 12:27 pm

Stephen Carlson wrote:The usual term I've heard is syncretic.

Apple system dictionary wrote:syncretism |ˈsiNGkrəˌtizəm|
noun
1 the amalgamation or attempted amalgamation of different religions, cultures, or schools of thought.
2 Linguistics the merging of different inflectional varieties of a word during the development of a language.

If I understand that definition rightly (no guarantee on that!), it appears rather to refer to a process in distinct words, something like Greek 3rd declension accusative plurals assimilating to the nominative (e.g. πόλεας ---⟩ πόλεις. Or is that what you mean, Barry?
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1393
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Terminology

Postby MAubrey » February 17th, 2014, 11:14 pm

Here you go:

http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/rbeard/extend.html

Cumulative Exponence is a fairly standard term.

Portmanteau is sometimes used as well.
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 654
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: Terminology

Postby cwconrad » February 18th, 2014, 6:16 am

MAubrey wrote:Here you go:

http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/rbeard/extend.html

Cumulative Exponence is a fairly standard term.

Portmanteau is sometimes used as well.

As in comparmented "carryall" luggage?? That's at least a suggestive metaphor. "Cumulative Exponence" is okay too if one commands Latin roots. God forbid we should all use the same term at all times and places for the same thing!
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1393
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Terminology

Postby MAubrey » February 18th, 2014, 9:50 am

cwconrad wrote:
MAubrey wrote:Here you go:

http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/rbeard/extend.html

Cumulative Exponence is a fairly standard term.

Portmanteau is sometimes used as well.

As in comparmented "carryall" luggage?? That's at least a suggestive metaphor. "Cumulative Exponence" is okay too if one commands Latin roots. God forbid we should all use the same term at all times and places for the same thing!


Portmanteau was stolen from Lewis Carroll's writings.
Wikipedia wrote:The word "portmanteau" was first used in this context by Lewis Carroll in the book Through the Looking-Glass (1871),[9] in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in Jabberwocky,[10] where "slithy" means "lithe and slimy" and "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable". Humpty Dumpty explains the practice of combining words in various ways by telling Alice,

'You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.'

In his introduction to The Hunting of the Snark, Carroll uses "portmanteau" when discussing lexical selection:

Humpty Dumpty's theory, of two meanings packed into one word like a portmanteau, seems to me the right explanation for all. For instance, take the two words "fuming" and "furious". Make up your mind that you will say both words, but leave it unsettled which you will say first ... if you have the rarest of gifts, a perfectly balanced mind, you will say "frumious".
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 654
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: Terminology

Postby cwconrad » February 18th, 2014, 10:03 am

MAubrey wrote:
cwconrad wrote:
MAubrey wrote:Here you go:

http://www.facstaff.bucknell.edu/rbeard/extend.html

Cumulative Exponence is a fairly standard term.

Portmanteau is sometimes used as well.

As in comparmented "carryall" luggage?? That's at least a suggestive metaphor. "Cumulative Exponence" is okay too if one commands Latin roots. God forbid we should all use the same term at all times and places for the same thing!


Portmanteau was stolen from Lewis Carroll's writings.
Wikipedia wrote:The word "portmanteau" was first used in this context by Lewis Carroll in the book Through the Looking-Glass (1871),[9] in which Humpty Dumpty explains to Alice the coinage of the unusual words in Jabberwocky,[10] where "slithy" means "lithe and slimy" and "mimsy" is "flimsy and miserable". Humpty Dumpty explains the practice of combining words in various ways by telling Alice,

'You see it's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.'

In his introduction to The Hunting of the Snark, Carroll uses "portmanteau" when discussing lexical selection:

Humpty Dumpty's theory, of two meanings packed into one word like a portmanteau, seems to me the right explanation for all. For instance, take the two words "fuming" and "furious". Make up your mind that you will say both words, but leave it unsettled which you will say first ... if you have the rarest of gifts, a perfectly balanced mind, you will say "frumious".

Jawohl! Spoken like a true Snark -- or should we say, "a frumious bandersnatch." All those tales-told-out-of-school about Liddell's daughter Alice and Dodgson a.k.a. Carroll. Once again I think back to that lazy Saturday afternoon more than a decade ago when Jonathan proposed a joint effort to put "Jabberwocky" into some sort of patchwork Greek.
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1393
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Terminology - confusing referencing

Postby Stephen Hughes » February 18th, 2014, 8:23 pm

Barry Hofstetter wrote:Is there a technical term for an ending that can refer to more than one thing? "Single termination" is what I remember a Greek professor of yore using, but is there something more sophistykated sounding? For example, -ῳ as a dative singular can be either masculine or neuter. How do we say that?

Looking at your question from the point of view of use, rather than form could I offer you another technical term.

I'm presuming that this question arose from the Antecedant of LATREUO of Rev. 22:3 thread. The word we use in English teaching for a pronoun used for a noun is "referencing".

A mixed-up, "He said that she was going to give him her apple, which they had told him that she could have." type sentence (or the part of Revelations 22:3 that we were looking at) would be "confusing referencing".
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attrib. to Albert Einstein)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1444
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Re: Terminology

Postby Stephen Carlson » February 20th, 2014, 4:28 pm

It's still not clear what's being asked. If it is that the masculine and the neuter share the same form, then syncretic may be appropriate. If it is that -ῷ expresses the categories of case, number, and gender in a single form, then cumulative exponence or even polyexponence would be appropriate.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke, New Testament)
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1978
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne


Return to Greek Language and Linguistics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron