Page 1 of 1

Seat of Moses (Singular and Plural in Koine Greek)

Posted: December 13th, 2018, 6:16 pm
by Jacob Rhoden
Ἐπὶ τῆς Μωϋσέως καθέδρας ἐκάθισαν οἱ γραμματεῖς καὶ οἱ Φαρισαῖοι
The article (excerpt below) asserts that the phrase "Seat of Moses" (cf Matthew 23:2) is singular, and hence it is difficult to suggest that the phrase could have referred literally to seats (plural) that would have been found in Synagogues. It seems to me that in English, it is possible to speak in non specifically in the singular of something that is in reality plural. i.e. "He likes to sit in the front seat of the bus" (even though there are many front seats in many busses, and every day he takes a seat in the front)

So how does it work in Greek, is the argument that the Greek is singular prohibit a literal interpretation of the "Seat of Moses"?

Screen Shot 2018-12-14 at 9.16.01 am.png
Screen Shot 2018-12-14 at 9.16.01 am.png (392.34 KiB) Viewed 7363 times

Re: Seat of Moses (Singular and Plural in Koine Greek)

Posted: December 13th, 2018, 6:58 pm
by timothy_p_mcmahon
Psalm 1:1 - μακαριος ανηρ ος ουκ επορευθη εν βουλη ασεβων και εν οδω αμαρτωλων ουκ εστη και επι καθεδραν λοιμων ουκ εκαθισεν
Is there but one seat for all the scorners?

Re: Seat of Moses (Singular and Plural in Koine Greek)

Posted: December 14th, 2018, 4:01 am
by Eeli Kaikkonen
I would rather ask: is there any language which doesn't have such flexibility?

Re: Seat of Moses (Singular and Plural in Koine Greek)

Posted: December 14th, 2018, 8:20 pm
by Jacob Rhoden
Eeli Kaikkonen wrote:
December 14th, 2018, 4:01 am
I would rather ask: is there any language which doesn't have such flexibility?
I am attempting to avoid the problem of assuming Greek operates like English. The wider question "Can all languages do this" is an interesting one though. Good point!

Re: Seat of Moses (Singular and Plural in Koine Greek)

Posted: December 14th, 2018, 8:25 pm
by Jacob Rhoden
timothy_p_mcmahon wrote:
December 13th, 2018, 6:58 pm
Psalm 1:1 - μακαριος ανηρ ος ουκ επορευθη εν βουλη ασεβων και εν οδω αμαρτωλων ουκ εστη και επι καθεδραν λοιμων ουκ εκαθισεν
Is there but one seat for all the scorners?
What a pertinent observation, thanks! I can't help but wonder if this passage is somewhat more clearly metaphorical. (I accept that it is legitimate understand that the "Seat of Moses" could have been literal or metaphorical, so I am hesitant to jump straight to a metaphorical understanding.)