Page 1 of 1

Introduction The Contribution of the Cordoba-School to the Lexicography of New Testament Greek

Posted: April 6th, 2019, 6:58 am
by Rogelio Toledo Martin
Dear friends and colleagues,

working on a paper I came across this book and this school of lexicography. Do you know them? I copy here the conclusion of the introduction.

Conclusion

It must be emphasized that the Cordoba-model truly constitutes a pioneering enterprise: For the first time in the history of the lexicography of not only New Testament Greek but in general of Ancient Greek (if not perhaps of all ancient languages!) a theory for describing lexical meaning is offered, which is based on modern linguistic principles and is attentive of the utmost complexity of the object under consideration. Although many critical questions could be addressed about the theory and serious shortcomings could be identified, it will for many years remain the solitary benchmark in the field. In particular, it will help scholars grappling with the problem of describing or representing lexical meaning of Greek words to acknowledge the complexity of the task, remind them that lexicography could accordingly only be done with reference to general linguistics and semantic theories, and lead them to ask the right questions and to attend to the appropriate problems, thereby refraining from simplistic—and therefore inappropriate—solutions.

Here the link to the book: https://www.degruyter.com/view/books/97 ... 73-001.xml

Kindest regards!

Re: Introduction The Contribution of the Cordoba-School to the Lexicography of New Testament Greek

Posted: April 7th, 2019, 5:39 am
by Stephen Carlson
These are the folks doing the Diccionario Griego-Español del Nuevo Testamento (DGENT). It is a well-respected but still on-going project. I think they're currently on words beginning with gamma (γ-).

Re: Introduction The Contribution of the Cordoba-School to the Lexicography of New Testament Greek

Posted: July 21st, 2019, 6:56 pm
by MAubrey
The original work was in Spanish and has been available for some time, though there's some new things here, too. It's a solid representation of structural semantics popular in the 1970's and 80's.