Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post Reply
Stirling Bartholomew
Posts: 931
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by Stirling Bartholomew » June 13th, 2016, 10:57 am

Anybody want to talk about this? I searched the archives and didn't find any reference to this.

The role of affectedness
in the verbal case marking of objects
in Ancient Greek


Daniel Riaño Rufilanchas
Departamento de Filología Clásica
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Affectedness Workshop 2015
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
August 13-14, 2015

http://affectednessworkshop2015.yolasit ... 202015.pdf
0 x


C. Stirling Bartholomew

Stirling Bartholomew
Posts: 931
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Re: Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by Stirling Bartholomew » June 13th, 2016, 12:41 pm

As I have
argued elsewhere (Riaño 2004, 2006a: 527–539) the main motivation for the case
marking of verbal objects in Greek is determined to a very large extent by the affectedness
of the object: the more affected objects are more likely to be coded with
the accusative case and behave as full-fledged direct objects (typically, admitting
the passive transformation). Less affected objects are more likely to be coded with
a different oblique case, even when they admit of the passive transformation. I
consider “most affected” objects to be the effected objects, i.e., objects that do not
pre-exist the verbal activity and are created by it, as in ‘to build a building’; next
come the objects whose referent is modified by the verbal action, as in ‘kill the
pest’ or ‘move the table’. Lowest in the scale are objects that remain indifferent
to the verbal action ...

Daniel Ria.o Rufilanchas
Differential Object Marking in Ancient Greek, page 525.
http://www.degruyter.com/dg/viewarticle ... 3-0071.xml
0 x
C. Stirling Bartholomew

MAubrey
Posts: 982
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Re: Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by MAubrey » June 13th, 2016, 2:27 pm

Luraghi effectively makes the same argument in On the Meaning of Prepositions and Cases: The expression of semantic roles in Ancient Greek

I think it's a fairly predictable point, though I'm that there are plenty of more complex details that could be pulled out for the choice of other cases for "less affected" objects.
0 x
Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Robert Crowe
Posts: 108
Joined: January 8th, 2016, 11:06 am
Location: Northern Ireland

Re: Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by Robert Crowe » June 14th, 2016, 8:31 am

Stirling Bartholomew wrote:As I have
argued elsewhere (Riaño 2004, 2006a: 527–539) the main motivation for the case
marking of verbal objects in Greek is determined to a very large extent by the affectedness
of the object: the more affected objects are more likely to be coded with
the accusative case and behave as full-fledged direct objects (typically, admitting
the passive transformation). Less affected objects are more likely to be coded with
a different oblique case, even when they admit of the passive transformation. I
consider “most affected” objects to be the effected objects, i.e., objects that do not
pre-exist the verbal activity and are created by it, as in ‘to build a building’; next
come the objects whose referent is modified by the verbal action, as in ‘kill the
pest’ or ‘move the table’. Lowest in the scale are objects that remain indifferent
to the verbal action ...

Daniel Ria.o Rufilanchas
Differential Object Marking in Ancient Greek, page 525.
http://www.degruyter.com/dg/viewarticle ... 3-0071.xml
I think a moot point here is the double accusative construction.

e.g. We appointed John president.

Traditionally, John is seen as the object affected, and president as the object-complement effected. We could, though, include either 'John' or 'president' in an extended verbal idea. Including the later as such gives us:

We appointed president John. (extended verb underlined) where 'John' remains the object affected. But taking 'John' as part of the verbal idea:
We appointed John president. Here the the object effected remains a complement and cannot be thought of as an accusative object.

But perhaps I'm reverting here to something I would coin meta-metalanguage.
0 x
Tús maith leath na hoibre.

Stirling Bartholomew
Posts: 931
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Re: Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by Stirling Bartholomew » June 16th, 2016, 1:24 pm

Daniel Riaño Rufilanchas was a participant in this fourm eons ago.
0 x
C. Stirling Bartholomew

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2825
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Role of affectedness in verbal case marking ...

Post by Stephen Carlson » June 16th, 2016, 7:18 pm

MAubrey wrote:Luraghi effectively makes the same argument in On the Meaning of Prepositions and Cases: The expression of semantic roles in Ancient Greek

I think it's a fairly predictable point, though I'm that there are plenty of more complex details that could be pulled out for the choice of other cases for "less affected" objects.
Luraghi does present a good overview of the concepts in (part of) her book, but lacks the fine detail that Riaño Rufilanchas gets into.
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Post Reply

Return to “Syntax and Grammar”