John 10:38 ἵνα γνῶτε καὶ γινώσκητε

Post Reply
Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1093
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

John 10:38 ἵνα γνῶτε καὶ γινώσκητε

Post by Barry Hofstetter » January 10th, 2018, 6:45 am

Assuming that καὶ γινώσκητε is the correct reading, what do we make of this? An aorist subjunctive followed by a present subjunctive? Any aspect mavens care to comment?
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
ἐγὼ δὲ διδάσκω τε καὶ γράφω ἵνα τὰ ἀξιώτερα μανθάνω

MAubrey
Posts: 878
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Re: John 10:38 ἵνα γνῶτε καὶ γινώσκητε

Post by MAubrey » January 10th, 2018, 7:54 pm

Given that all the rest of the coordinated instances of the same verb with a different tense always denotes a difference in meaning, it stands to reason that it is also the case here.

Most such pairs involve something contrasted a future, but John 16:32 is a respectable example: ἰδοὺ ἔρχεται ὥρα καὶ ἐλήλυθεν

As is Hebrews 11:17: Πίστει προσενήνοχεν Ἀβραὰμ τὸν Ἰσαὰκ πειραζόμενος, καὶ τὸν μονογενῆ προσέφερεν ὁ τὰς ἐπαγγελίας ἀναδεξάμενος

In the LXX, there's also Sirach 16:6: ἐν συναγωγῇ ἁμαρτωλῶν ἐκκαυθήσεται πῦρ, καὶ ἐν ἔθνει ἀπειθεῖ ἐξεκαύθη ὀργή

My understanding of the semantics of γινώσκω is that there's a greater preference for stative expressions with the imperfective vs. the perfective. I'd vote for 'learn/recognize/come to know' for the perfective and something like 'be sure' for the imperfective.
Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest