Where is the sigma in διδάσκειν from?

Semantic Range, Lexicography, and other approaches to word meaning - in general, or for particular words.
Stephen Hughes
Posts: 3323
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am

Re: Where is the sigma in διδάσκειν from?

Post by Stephen Hughes » February 22nd, 2016, 7:14 am

cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:Is the -sc- in Latin part of derivational morphology (as in Koine) or part of inflectional pattern (as Homer uses it)?
It's an iterative/durative/inchoative verbal formative. Compare Lat. no-sc-ere with Gr. γι(γ(νώ-σκ-ειν; Lat. cre-sc-ere "grow", Lat. albe-sc-ere "become white", etc.
Are there non-sc- forms of those verbs in use? Perhaps, cr-ere* "to foster growth"*, or alb-ere* "to whiten"*
0 x


Γελᾷ δ' ὁ μωρός, κἄν τι μὴ γέλοιον ᾖ
(Menander, Γνῶμαι μονόστιχοι 108)

Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2837
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Where is the sigma in διδάσκειν from?

Post by Stephen Carlson » February 22nd, 2016, 7:37 am

Stephen Hughes wrote:
cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:Is the -sc- in Latin part of derivational morphology (as in Koine) or part of inflectional pattern (as Homer uses it)?
It's an iterative/durative/inchoative verbal formative. Compare Lat. no-sc-ere with Gr. γι(γ(νώ-σκ-ειν; Lat. cre-sc-ere "grow", Lat. albe-sc-ere "become white", etc.
Are there non-sc- forms of those verbs in use? Perhaps, cr-ere* "to foster growth"*, or alb-ere* "to whiten"*
You can access the Lewis & Short dictionary here: http://archimedes.fas.harvard.edu/pollux/ (defaults to LSJ, but use the drop down menu box). Verbs are looked up in the first person, and there is a verb albeo, albere ("to be white").
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Post Reply

Return to “Word Meanings”