Vocabulary Pictures

Resources and methods for teaching and learning New Testament Greek.

Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jesse Goulet » June 5th, 2014, 10:37 pm

Using my flashcard program, I'm about to begin creating a flashcard deck that is based on images, where the goal is to identify the image using the Greek word, as opposed to identifying the Greek word with the English gloss. I begun studying some French and have an app on my iPhone and iPad of basic vocabulary that uses pictures of common objects.

I realized, though, that using objects works for concrete words, such as objects and action verbs (e.g., pencil, desk, lamp, chair, running, jumping, etc.). But abstract words are more difficult to capture in an image (e.g., hope, faith, waiting, answering). Even more so, conjunctions, particles, etc.

So my question is, can image-based vocabulary study incorporate abstract concept and non-concrete words?
Jesse Goulet
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 15th, 2011, 12:48 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby James Cuénod » June 6th, 2014, 4:34 am

I've been thinking of drawing some pictures (who knows when though) for prepositions.

It's easy enough to draw a box something like:
εἰς -> ἐν -> ἐκ

I've been wanting to include all that occur 10 or more times in the NT though. Of course, there are some that are more difficult to visualise and especially to communicate clearly through an image.

So to answer your question; to some extent. The problem is that, like learning glosses, the semantic range is still going to be different. When I see a fox I still only think of an animal and perhaps "cunning/sly" but there are no connotations of "destructive" which is part of the idiomatic range of ἀλώπηξ.
James Cuénod
 
Posts: 13
Joined: July 14th, 2011, 3:56 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Devenios Doulenios » June 6th, 2014, 9:10 am

Jesse,

I applaud you for wanting to avoid English glosses when working with new Greek vocabulary. It probably can't always be avoided, though.

For some abstract words pictures can work, if carefully chosen. For others, perhaps not.

One thing that probably also would help is using short simple Greek definitions instead of glosses along with the images, and also adding sound clips pronouncing the word if your software supports that.

You should take a look at how W.H.D. Rouse did it with the vocabulary for his story A Greek Boy at Home, a story for first-year students written in simple Attic Greek. Rouse does use English glosses for some words, but even then he often provides a short definition in Greek. (If you don't feel ready to compose these yourself, Rouse would have definitions for some words you might want, and I'm sure some list members would help with hints for this.)

Here are the download links for his story book and the vocab (The vocabulary is in a separate volume; both are availible in PDFs).

Story: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_at_home

Vocabulary: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_vocab

I am attempting this approach (using definitions in the target language instead of English glosses) for learning Biblical Hebrew vocabulary, starting with that for Jonah, which I'm working with now. I'll put a sample up on the B-Hebrew forum soon.

I have an iPad too and am continuing to look for things related to Greek to use on it. Which software are you using for the flashcards?

Δεβἐνιος Δουλἐνιος
Dewayne Dulaney
"τὴν ζωὴν καὶ τὸν θάνατον δέδωκα πρὸ προσώπου ὑμῶν τὴν εὐλογίαν καὶ τὴν κατάραν ἔκλεξαι τὴν ζωήν ἵνα ζῇς σὺ καὶ τὸ σπέρμα σου"-Dt. 30:19

"Ὁδοὶ δύο εἰσί, μία τῆς ζωῆς καὶ μία τοῦ θανάτου."--Διδαχή Α, α'
Devenios Doulenios
 
Posts: 73
Joined: May 31st, 2011, 5:11 pm
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jonathan Robie » June 6th, 2014, 2:27 pm

Devenios Doulenios wrote:Here are the download links for his story book and the vocab (The vocabulary is in a separate volume; both are availible in PDFs).

Story: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_at_home

Vocabulary: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_vocab


For flashcards, you may want the machine readable version here:

http://heml.mta.ca/lace/catalog

It needs correcting. If anyone wants to do that correction and make it available, please contact me.
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1494
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jonathan Robie » June 6th, 2014, 2:56 pm

Jesse Goulet wrote:So my question is, can image-based vocabulary study incorporate abstract concept and non-concrete words?


I've been using Google image search for this kind of thing. The trick seems to be to combine the abstract word with a concrete one. For instance, "hope" is hard to picture, so a Google image search for hope doesn't give good results, but try hope face girl, most images aren't helpful, but you find a few good ones like this:

Image

Or try hope face dog, I like this one.

For εἰς -> ἐν -> ἐκ, consider searches that include dogs, people, etc. together with words like 'house'. You will find images like these:

Image

Image
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1494
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jesse Goulet » June 7th, 2014, 9:35 am

James Cuénod wrote:The problem is that, like learning glosses, the semantic range is still going to be different. When I see a fox I still only think of an animal and perhaps "cunning/sly" but there are no connotations of "destructive" which is part of the idiomatic range of ἀλώπηξ.

A very good point.

I think the goal of vocabulary acquisition is to gain a fundamental working knowledge of words first. Additional connotations I believe can and should be picked up by seeing the word used in multiple contexts, just like how we learn naturally in our primary language.
Jesse Goulet
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 15th, 2011, 12:48 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jesse Goulet » June 7th, 2014, 9:37 am

Devenios Doulenios wrote:Jesse,

I applaud you for wanting to avoid English glosses when working with new Greek vocabulary. It probably can't always be avoided, though.

For some abstract words pictures can work, if carefully chosen. For others, perhaps not.

One thing that probably also would help is using short simple Greek definitions instead of glosses along with the images, and also adding sound clips pronouncing the word if your software supports that.

You should take a look at how W.H.D. Rouse did it with the vocabulary for his story A Greek Boy at Home, a story for first-year students written in simple Attic Greek. Rouse does use English glosses for some words, but even then he often provides a short definition in Greek. (If you don't feel ready to compose these yourself, Rouse would have definitions for some words you might want, and I'm sure some list members would help with hints for this.)

Here are the download links for his story book and the vocab (The vocabulary is in a separate volume; both are availible in PDFs).

Story: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_at_home

Vocabulary: http://www.johnpiazza.net/greek_boy_vocab

I am attempting this approach (using definitions in the target language instead of English glosses) for learning Biblical Hebrew vocabulary, starting with that for Jonah, which I'm working with now. I'll put a sample up on the B-Hebrew forum soon.

I have an iPad too and am continuing to look for things related to Greek to use on it. Which software are you using for the flashcards?

Δεβἐνιος Δουλἐνιος
Dewayne Dulaney

I use Loopware's iFlash. You can add images and audio to your cards, multiple fonts, your decks can have as many card "sides" as you wish.
Jesse Goulet
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 15th, 2011, 12:48 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby Jesse Goulet » June 7th, 2014, 9:42 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:
Jesse Goulet wrote:So my question is, can image-based vocabulary study incorporate abstract concept and non-concrete words?


I've been using Google image search for this kind of thing. The trick seems to be to combine the abstract word with a concrete one. For instance, "hope" is hard to picture, so a Google image search for hope doesn't give good results, but try hope face girl, most images aren't helpful, but you find a few good ones like this:

Image

Or try hope face dog, I like this one.

For εἰς -> ἐν -> ἐκ, consider searches that include dogs, people, etc. together with words like 'house'. You will find images like these:

Image

Image

That is what I have been doing as well. It is difficult and takes time to find the right image! I even go as far as trying to use images with ancient looking people instead of modern people if i can, it adds to the immersion experience.

Prepositions are usually, most of them are concrete expressions (up, upon, through, alongside, etc.). But the abstract ones such as διά with the accusative ("on account of") is not going to be easy. That is what I need some suggestions for.
Jesse Goulet
 
Posts: 85
Joined: October 15th, 2011, 12:48 pm

Re: Vocabulary Pictures

Postby RandallButh » June 8th, 2014, 2:06 am

Jesse Goulet wrote:
James Cuénod wrote:The problem is that, like learning glosses, the semantic range is still going to be different. When I see a fox I still only think of an animal and perhaps "cunning/sly" but there are no connotations of "destructive" which is part of the idiomatic range of ἀλώπηξ.

A very good point.

I think the goal of vocabulary acquisition is to gain a fundamental working knowledge of words first. Additional connotations I believe can and should be picked up by seeing the word used in multiple contexts, just like how we learn naturally in our primary language.


In Jewish culture, a fox was the opposite of a lion. "Go tell that fox . . . " was a put down.
RandallButh
 
Posts: 590
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Fox opposite lion

Postby Wes Wood » June 8th, 2014, 9:55 am

Please forgive the off topic post, but thanks for filling that phrase out. That gives a contrast element that I wasn't aware of. I am am a child of the Deep South. I hadn't considered foxes being opposite of anything but hounds.
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 200
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm


Return to Teaching and Learning Greek

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest