What Now?

Resources and methods for teaching and learning New Testament Greek.
RandallButh
Posts: 877
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: What Now?

Post by RandallButh » December 1st, 2015, 6:58 pm

No, I didn't even know it existed sorry. But even with those grammatical notes ...
Chris, part of growing up is learning to speak about what one knows and to refrain from judging what one does not have data on. You will, of course, excuse the potential paternalistic tone of the last sentence. It was meant in good faith. Just keep learning and don't give up hope of being fluent in Spanish. We learn languages by using them.

Chris Servanti
Posts: 55
Joined: September 10th, 2015, 2:30 pm

Re: What Now?

Post by Chris Servanti » December 1st, 2015, 7:31 pm

RandallButh wrote:
No, I didn't even know it existed sorry. But even with those grammatical notes ...
Chris, part of growing up is learning to speak about what one knows and to refrain from judging what one does not have data on. You will, of course, excuse the potential paternalistic tone of the last sentence. It was meant in good faith. Just keep learning and don't give up hope of being fluent in Spanish. We learn languages by using them.
Sorry if my suggestions came off harsh. Where might I find the grammar notes? I have the downloads for the the videos and for the text of what the video is saying, but I don't know where to get the grammar notes.

I totally believe that speaking fluent Koine is possible. But in order to do that, one must think it Koine. And as you said that takes lots and lots of practice and usage. So maybe if someone used Koine at home like Eliezer Ben-Yehuda did with Hebrew (not just for occasional speaking to one's self but actually for practical, "Do the dishes" moments) we could have some speakers. I know that there have been some attempts to bring people together to speak only Koine, but if some people were to put some serious time in preparation for such an event, maybe it could progress. (As a note though, it is also possible to become fluid in a language without talking with other people much. In practically my entire time of learning Spanish I have talked with very few people in Spanish, but I talk to myself and read it all the time. So I do recognize that as a possibility. I think that's where lies the difference between fluidity and fluency; being comfortable in a language very, very versus using it in all four areas as well as an adult native speaker.)

RandallButh
Posts: 877
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: What Now?

Post by RandallButh » December 1st, 2015, 8:09 pm

Where might I find the grammar notes? I have the downloads for the the videos and for the text of what the video is saying,
It sounds like you only have the preparatory "Part One" to Living Koine Greek. Parts 2a and 2b have the extended notes worked into the lessons and interspersed between audio/oral drills. Plus, all readings are annotated with occasional 'discourse' notes clarifying the significance of an author choosing one structure instead of another.

Chris Servanti
Posts: 55
Joined: September 10th, 2015, 2:30 pm

Re: What Now?

Post by Chris Servanti » December 1st, 2015, 8:23 pm

RandallButh wrote:
Where might I find the grammar notes? I have the downloads for the the videos and for the text of what the video is saying,
It sounds like you only have the preparatory "Part One" to Living Koine Greek. Parts 2a and 2b have the extended notes worked into the lessons and interspersed between audio/oral drills. Plus, all readings are annotated with occasional 'discourse' notes clarifying the significance of an author choosing one structure instead of another.
Ah, that would explain. My resources were limited so I only bought one.

So, I heard you talking about it before and I assume your a good source: what is the relationship between modern and Koine Greek, and how wide is the wedge between them?

Shirley Rollinson
Posts: 282
Joined: June 4th, 2011, 6:19 pm
Location: New Mexico
Contact:

Re: What Now?

Post by Shirley Rollinson » December 2nd, 2015, 6:13 pm

Jonathan Robie wrote: - - - snip snip - - - 1 Maccabees is a fun read.
As are Judith, Susanna, and Bel and the Dragon :-)
And Genesis and Exodus and Job give new vocabulary and a good story-line.

Regarding your question about further grammar or further reading - go for further reading. If you meet some grammar that gives you a problem, bring it to B-Greek, or try Smyth's Greek Grammar (though that is mainly for classical rather than koine Greek)
It also helps if you make notes on what you read - new vocabulary, constructions, etc., then review it at the end of a week or a month.

Shirley Rollinson

Louis L Sorenson
Posts: 705
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA
Contact:

Re: What Now?

Post by Louis L Sorenson » December 3rd, 2015, 1:46 am

Chris,

What to do next? Read Read Read. But do not only read Biblical texts. You are too familiar with them. There are some Semitic Koine texts, like Joseph and Asenath, Maccabees (some written in Greek and some translated), early writings of the church fathers. There also some secular Koine texts such as Epictetus. I've got a website on his Enchiridion (http://www.letsreadgreek.com/Epictetus/index.htm). There is also several other Greek works such as Plato, which contain dialogues. Geoffrey Steadman has a site http://geoffreysteadman.com/ which has some very helpful reader books. Some on Plato. The Tablet of Cebes (which may be Koine) (http://geoffreysteadman.com/cebes-tablet/) could be another fun book.

Ideally, you can find a partner/teacher who can talk in Greek with you about the text. It is good to know the gist of the story-line. But, sometimes, knowing all the details (like knowing about the Marriage in Cana), can inhibit learning, especially if the conversation is limited to only the options/objects/actions that happen in the text. Learning is inhibited because you mind already knows the answer/outcome/ -- but I think that discussing NT texts in Greek (asking questions, giving alternative answers and scenarios, and 'circling' around a text which you know is a good way to learn. You just have to expose yourself to more Greek in context that is present in any given NT passage.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest