Prompts for teaching verbs

Emma Ehrhardt
Posts: 58
Joined: December 23rd, 2014, 10:28 am
Location: IN
Contact:

Re: Prompts for teaching verbs

Post by Emma Ehrhardt » December 23rd, 2014, 7:24 pm

Jonathan Robie wrote:When reading, we usually see the verb and have to figure out who the subject and objects could logically be. The above exercises are more useful for writing than for reading. Reversing the question tests the other direction...
Both types of exercises are useful, because they get require the student to manipulate the language. In general, I think the more ways we try to get at teaching a skill, the more likely we will hit on something students jive with. This also ends up exercising the brain in slightly different ways, so learners become comfortable encountering Greek in various contexts. (Which would be a great relief for those who are of the 'learn this vocab and its gloss in isolation' school, who get frustrated because they have their flashcard deck down pat, but fail to recognize those same words in context.)
0 x


Emma Ehrhardt
Computational Linguist

Paul-Nitz
Posts: 475
Joined: June 1st, 2011, 4:19 am
Location: Lilongwe, Malawi

Re: Prompts for teaching verbs

Post by Paul-Nitz » December 24th, 2014, 8:37 am

Could you explain a bit more on this last post.
  • Why do you prefer τίς μακάριος εἴναι; over τίς μακάριος ἐστίν; ???

    In the "Reversing the question" drill, I'm not seeing the difference. Mark for us what is produced by the computer and what is produced by the learner.
0 x
Paul D. Nitz - Lilongwe Malawi

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3628
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Prompts for teaching verbs

Post by Jonathan Robie » December 24th, 2014, 9:49 am

Paul-Nitz wrote:Why do you prefer τίς μακάριος εἴναι; over τίς μακάριος ἐστίν; ???
I'm not sure that I do. I know that some people really want to leverage the infinitive form, which the infinitive form of the question does.
Paul-Nitz wrote:In the "Reversing the question" drill, I'm not seeing the difference. Mark for us what is produced by the computer and what is produced by the learner.
Sure. The computer presents this prompt:

Code: Select all

μακάριος εἶ.

τίς μακάριός ἐστιν;
The learner notes the form εἶ, and responds:

Code: Select all

σύ
Actually, that's not terribly different from a cloze along these lines:

Code: Select all

{{cl1::σύ}} μακάριος εἶ.[/quote]

The {{cl1::XXX}} bit indicates that XXX is what the learner is asked to supply.
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Post Reply

Return to “Teaching Methods”