Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Textbooks, Graded Readers, Beginner Resources and links, Teaching aids, etc.

Re: Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Postby cwconrad » January 22nd, 2014, 5:58 am

Stephen Carlson wrote:
cwconrad wrote:Wallace makes no reference to this passage in his discussion of the Partitive Genitive (page 84), which he seems to prefer to call the "Wholative Genitive".

That tends to be my problem with Wallace: often the passages I have a question about are not discussed in the grammar, even though many other less controversial ones are. BDF tends to have better coverage of the less straightforward cases.

That's like the problem I have with commentators -- idiosyncrasy: they more often discuss matters that don't seem problematic to me but fail to discuss what I find problematic. Which simply goes to show, of course, that different ἀπορίαι disturb different readers. I often wonder why the choice of texts illustrative of a construction seems so eclectic; some of them probably arose in the classroom or in student queries. I also wonder about terms like "Wholative": it's not, he claims, a "genitive of the part" but a "genitive of the whole." I understand the idea, but the coinage seems weird to me -- constructed from an English noun-stem and a Latinate suffix.
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
… ἐπειδὴ καὶ τὸν οἶνον ἠξίους
πίνειν, συνεκποτέ’ ἐστί σοι καὶ τὴν τρύγα Aristophanes, Plutus 1085
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1315
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Postby Stephen Carlson » January 22nd, 2014, 6:23 am

cwconrad wrote:That's like the problem I have with commentators -- idiosyncrasy: they more often discuss matters that don't seem problematic to me but fail to discuss what I find problematic. Which simply goes to show, of course, that different ἀπορίαι disturb different readers. I often wonder why the choice of texts illustrative of a construction seems so eclectic; some of them probably arose in the classroom or in student queries. I also wonder about terms like "Wholative": it's not, he claims, a "genitive of the part" but a "genitive of the whole." I understand the idea, but the coinage seems weird to me -- constructed from an English noun-stem and a Latinate suffix.

If I recall correctly, that is indeed the origin of Wallace's grammar: an expanded set of teaching materials.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke, New Testament)
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1881
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics

Postby Shirley Rollinson » January 22nd, 2014, 8:04 pm

Barry Hofstetter wrote:On the more serious side, I find far too often that people are studying grammars such as Wallace rather than spending the time reading the Greek text, and then using the grammars as reference tools. As I mentioned on the Greek Club, if you spend a lot of time reading grammars, you get good at reading grammars. If you spend a lot of time reading Greek...

Preach it Bro'
Shirley Rollinson
:D
Shirley Rollinson
 
Posts: 145
Joined: June 4th, 2011, 6:19 pm
Location: New Mexico

Previous

Return to Resources

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest