Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Textbooks, Graded Readers, Beginner Resources and links, Teaching aids, etc.

Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Wes Wood » April 2nd, 2014, 3:06 pm

Does anyone here have a strong recommendation for an introductory textbook or primer for high school classroom use? I am especially interested in books that could serve well in either a classroom or independent learning setting. Any experiences or advice for teaching this material to this age group would be appreciated.
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 287
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Barry Hofstetter » April 3rd, 2014, 4:57 am

I used Crosby & Schaeffer supplemented with Athenaze. If I get enough students for next year's Greek elective, I plan to use quite a different approach, but probably with Athenaze as the base text.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Barry Hofstetter
 
Posts: 640
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Jonathan Robie » April 3rd, 2014, 7:34 am

Quite a different approach?
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1594
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Barry Hofstetter » April 3rd, 2014, 9:16 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:Quite a different approach?


I've been fairly heavy on a reading-grammar methodology, but since this is a one trimester elective, I plan to experiment with a much more oral/aural, conversational method.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Barry Hofstetter
 
Posts: 640
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby cwconrad » April 3rd, 2014, 10:07 am

Barry Hofstetter wrote:
Jonathan Robie wrote:Quite a different approach?


I've been fairly heavy on a reading-grammar methodology, but since this is a one trimester elective, I plan to experiment with a much more oral/aural, conversational method.

More power to you, Barry! I'm thirteen years out of teaching Greek now, but there are a lot of things I'd do differently if I were starting over at teaching it -- far too numerous to mention ...
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1391
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Paul-Nitz » April 3rd, 2014, 11:18 am

You might consider the Living Koine series.
http://www.biblicallanguagecenter.com/
Paul D. Nitz - Lilongwe Malawi
Paul-Nitz
 
Posts: 207
Joined: June 1st, 2011, 4:19 am

Re: Classical Greek Grammars for High School Students

Postby Wes Wood » April 3rd, 2014, 10:55 pm

Thank all of you for your input. Professor Hofstetter, did you primarily follow the lesson progression in Athenaze or in your other resource(s)? On a side note, I wish you success if you implement new strategies. It is extremely stressful for me to make changes in methods I have had success with in the past. Standardized testing in high school tends to perpetuate the status quo where I am. (If most "pass" it is good enough.)
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 287
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Classical education not just Greek.

Postby Stephen Hughes » April 4th, 2014, 1:02 am

Abbot and Mansfield is a short primer of Greek grammar for middle school.

Senior students usually read the so-called school texts. Those are editions of some of the Classical authours with lots of notes in them, and difficult passages are simply translated for them rather than explained.

Greek is more than the language, it's also an education about the classical world and the Western heritage, so there is an element of background - history and culture - studies involved.

In New South Wales, students are typically highly intelligent, high achievers who score well in their matriculation exams. Only a few schools offer Greek.

If someone were personally wanting to diversify from NT to Classical Greek, I would suggest they try just reading Xenophon's Anabasis, to realise how much you know and to see what you still need to achieve. Then try one of the plays by Euripides. Both of those works are recommended / required for high school students studying Greek.
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attrib. to Albert Einstein)
"I think that that that that that boy used is wrong." (Intonate that to show that you understand English that)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1433
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Re: Classical education not just Greek.

Postby cwconrad » April 4th, 2014, 6:00 am

Stephen Hughes wrote:If someone were personally wanting to diversify from NT to Classical Greek, I would suggest they try just reading Xenophon's Anabasis, to realise how much you know and to see what you still need to achieve. Then try one of the plays by Euripides. Both of those works are recommended / required for high school students studying Greek.

Yes, those were standard choices, dating back, I think, to British public schools where boys (chiefly) were preparing for careers involving military service in the British colonies: Xenophon's Anabasis and Caesar's Gallic Wars. I'd cut the selections from the Anabasis in half and replace the missing half with a couple books from Xenophon's Memorabilita: that provides more of a taste of daily life in Athens of the later 5th century.
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1391
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Christianised classical heritage

Postby Stephen Hughes » April 4th, 2014, 7:23 am

cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:If someone were personally wanting to diversify from NT to Classical Greek, I would suggest they try just reading Xenophon's Anabasis, to realise how much you know and to see what you still need to achieve. Then try one of the plays by Euripides. Both of those works are recommended / required for high school students studying Greek.

Yes, those Greek texts were standard choices, dating back, I think, to British public schools where boys (chiefly) were preparing for careers involving military service in the British colonies: Xenophon's Anabasis and Caesar's Gallic Wars. I'd cut the selections from the Anabasis in half and replace the missing half with a couple books from Xenophon's Memorabilita: that provides more of a taste of daily life in Athens of the later 5th century.

Reading those texts that I mentioned is following the Byzantine educational system. The great fathers; Basil, Gregory, Gregory, John Chrysostom and Julian the apostate would have all started with those texts, then moved on to Lysias and Sophocles and then eventually on to Demosthenes. Later students would progress to John Chrysostom after Demosthenes on the Crown. Classical education is demonstrably the legitimate successor to the Byzantine educational heritage. Then (as now) education for the Christianised Romans used secular (even pagan) sources to learn the language in which they delivered the Christian message. The educated of Byzantium were not an enclave of Athinite monks slavishly reciting the NT and other ecclesiastical texts, they were the vibrant successors of a Christianised Classical heritage. Following the fall of Constantinople we in the West (How is Australia west when it is in the far south-east?) were given the privilage of carrying the torch of both the classical Greek and Roman heritage. An earnest study of the classics was expected of those who wanted to read not only our Classical past but also our ever-renewed present in Christ. The classics are not an invitation to return to the errors of paganism and pre-Christian humanism and democracy as some of the Italian city-states did during the Renaissance, but a call to accept all that is good and beautiful in both God and man's creation and to sanctify whatever can be found for the glory of God.

A classical education is THE key to the fathers, it is the broader context in which to understand the New Testament linguistically, it is a tangible continuation of the Ancient world - the world which gave us our Greek New Testament - into our present day.
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attrib. to Albert Einstein)
"I think that that that that that boy used is wrong." (Intonate that to show that you understand English that)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1433
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Next

Return to Resources

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest