Containers in Greek

Post Reply
Stephen Hughes
Posts: 3323
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am

Containers in Greek

Post by Stephen Hughes » May 31st, 2015, 1:36 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:
Emma Ehrhardt wrote:Pick a domain, send them to Louw & Nida to get the relevant vocabulary, then have them check relatively frequency of the terms, and let them have at creating the picture books using open-licensed images from the web.
There are two issues with this approach.

First is collocations.

L&N is great, but lacks collocational information on what to sensibly do with the vocabulary. To some degree that can be gleaned from LSJ, or other dictionaries with examples cited.

Second is dumbing down the Greek.

In 6 P - Containers, for example puts
6.118 σκεῦος ... a highly generic term for any jar, bowl, basket or vase
While Byzantinou (1854) as a Greek-to-Greek (Classical to high-register Katharevousa) resource uses ἀγγεῖον as the generic term in his descriptions of things. Look at these few examples:
ImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

χύτρα is classical, but not in the NT vocabulary, and is used in the Modern idiom as a casserole pot, but is cognate anyway with this group.

δοχεῖον is described by Caruso simply as "ἀγγεῖον", with the suggestion to look up the verb too. Byzantinou says it is a μέρος in the sense of an ἀγγεῖον with some qualifications added ("which receives something within it").
Image
Δοχεῖον (τὸ). μέρος (ἀγγεῖον) τὸ ὁπ. δέχεταί τι ἐντὸς αὐτοῦ.

Point being, just using L&N and frequencies, may not be enough to be enough to dumb down the Greek for picture books. Finding the exact term for something is a different line of inquiry, and is actually a bit easier than finding a generic word for a concept. Presumably picture books need to be written in as simple as possible Greek. That means understanding the meaning structures between words, not only their cognate groupings. That is the end of the second point that I wanted to raise.
0 x


Γελᾷ δ' ὁ μωρός, κἄν τι μὴ γέλοιον ᾖ
(Menander, Γνῶμαι μονόστιχοι 108)

Louis L Sorenson
Posts: 706
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA
Contact:

Re: Emma's picture book idea

Post by Louis L Sorenson » May 31st, 2015, 1:59 am

Here is a list of words I've added to my "Container" wordlist. Not all container words are listed, but most of these are NT words or subject relevant.

ΑΓΓΕΙΑ·
ἀγγεῖον, -ου, τό container, vessel, flask; box (for holding liquid or dry substances)
ἄγγος, -ους, τό vessel, a container primarily for liquids or wet objects
ἀμφορεύς, -έως, ὁ amphora, a jar with a narrow neck, holding about 9 liters (= 1.5 Roman amphora), used mostly for wine, oil; = μετρήτης
ἀσκός, -οῦ, ὁ leather bag, esp. wineskin
ἄντλημα, -ατος, τό a bucket for drawing water
κεράμιον, -ου, τό earthenware jar (ὕδατος, οἶνου, ἐλαίου)
κιβωτός, -οῦ, ἡ box, container (ark of the covenant; Noah’s ark)
κίνητρον, -ου, τό stick for stirring
κρατήρ, -ῆρος, ὁ a mixing vessel (mostly for wine cf. ‘crater’)
κύαθος, -ου, ὁ ladle.
πίθος, -ου, ὁ a large ceramic storage container (from 40 l. to 996 l.)
ποτήριον, -ου, τό a vessel used for drinking, cup (ὕδατος)
σκεῦος –ους, τό a container of any kind, vessel, jar, dish; equipment
σπόγγος, -ου, ὁ sponge
στάμνος, -ου, ὁ a jar with a lid (the manna jar Heb. 9.4)
τρύβλιον, -ου, τό bowl, dish (cf. Mk. 14.20; Mt. 26.23)
ὑδρία, -ας, ἡ water-jar
χαλκίον, -ου, τό a copper, brass, or bronze kettle
φιάλη, -ης, ἡ a bowl (cf. ‘vial’, 8x+ in Rev.)
φρέαρ, -ατος, τό well, water supply
0 x

Thomas Dolhanty
Posts: 400
Joined: May 20th, 2014, 10:13 am
Location: west coast of Canada

Re: Emma's picture book idea

Post by Thomas Dolhanty » May 31st, 2015, 9:43 am

Louis L Sorenson wrote:Here is a list of words I've added to my "Container" wordlist. Not all container words are listed, but most of these are NT words or subject relevant.

ΑΓΓΕΙΑ·
... ZIP ...
I love these lists where you gather together under a collective English noun a whole series of related Greek terms with different applications and different nuances.

So helpful when doing composition. Thank you.
0 x
γράφω μαθεῖν

Post Reply