The Objective of “Biblical Greek” Pedagogy

Thomas Dolhanty
Posts: 400
Joined: May 20th, 2014, 10:13 am
Location: west coast of Canada

Re: The Objective of “Biblical Greek” Pedagogy

Post by Thomas Dolhanty » June 11th, 2015, 2:56 am

Andrew Chapman wrote:If one thing we are trying to do is to read outside the New Testament, then I personally would benefit from the opportunity to discuss the text, perhaps in 'Koine Greek Texts' or 'Other Greek Texts'. I am thinking of 1) the papyri, there are some suitable ones I think in Milligan's Selections from the Greek Papyri 2) Shepherd of Hermas; 3) Aesop's Fables. Just one papyrus - a letter home, say, or a marriage contract; or one fable; or, I guess half a chapter of ὁ Ποιμήν, to begin with. What do you think?

Andrew
My own extra-Biblical reading right now is all over the place and quite eclectic. This summer I am more interested in just reading than in getting too analytical with the text. I'm also trying to learn how to compose sentences in Hellenistic Greek. One of the things I'm planning to read (at least in part) is Babrius which I've also ordered in hardcopy.

The links that appear under the Aesop thread look interesting to me and I think Jonathan is right; Louis' collection looks like a great place to start.
0 x


γράφω μαθεῖν

Paul-Nitz
Posts: 433
Joined: June 1st, 2011, 4:19 am
Location: Lilongwe, Malawi

Re: The Objective of “Biblical Greek” Pedagogy

Post by Paul-Nitz » June 11th, 2015, 4:00 am

A couple of pages back, I had asked,
If we would be satisfied with the idea that the objective is "reading," then I think the next logical question is about the pedagogy:
  • With what approach and with which methods do we learn and teach?

    ἆρα ἐν τίνι εἰσόδῳ καὶ ἐν τίσι τρόποις δεῖ ἡμᾶς μανθάνειν καὶ διδάσκειν τὴν κοινήν Ἑλληνικήν γλώσσαν εἰς τὸ ἀναγινώσκειν τὴν καινήν διαθήκην;
I was trying to get back to the original idea that initiated this thread. Since I asked that question, we have heard many interesting comments on what kind of stories might be used in teaching / learning Greek. And now, the comments are getting more specific about what materials might be used or adapted for the purpose.

It's all useful. We could compose simple stories for low level. We could choose simple Biblical texts. We could adapt Biblical stories. We could use Aesop or Koine texts. What I believe will make these efforts much more useful is keeping this principle of language learning in mind: Aim at providing learners with "comprehensible input."
0 x
Paul D. Nitz - Lilongwe Malawi

Andrew Chapman
Posts: 258
Joined: February 5th, 2013, 5:04 am
Location: Oxford, England
Contact:

Re: The Objective of “Biblical Greek” Pedagogy

Post by Andrew Chapman » June 11th, 2015, 1:54 pm

Thomas Dolhanty wrote:The links that appear under the Aesop thread look interesting to me and I think Jonathan is right; Louis' collection looks like a great place to start.
Paul-Nitz wrote:Aim at providing learners with "comprehensible input."
I had a look at the first fable on Louis Sorenson's site, Ἀλώπηξ καὶ βότρυς. Personally, I find the Chambry version 1 quite hard enough, since there's plenty of new vocabulary. But if others prefer Babrius, then I could have a go at that.

Andrew
0 x

Thomas Dolhanty
Posts: 400
Joined: May 20th, 2014, 10:13 am
Location: west coast of Canada

Re: The Objective of “Biblical Greek” Pedagogy

Post by Thomas Dolhanty » June 11th, 2015, 2:46 pm

Andrew Chapman wrote:I had a look at the first fable on Louis Sorenson's site, Ἀλώπηξ καὶ βότρυς. Personally, I find the Chambry version 1 quite hard enough, since there's plenty of new vocabulary. But if others prefer Babrius, then I could have a go at that.

Andrew
Chambry's cool, Andrew, as long as we are not planning on going too fast. Those who wish can do the Babrius version in parallel, as long the pace is easy. I rather guess I'll be learning at least as much vocabulary as you, but I do want to do a big bite of Babrius this summer.
0 x
γράφω μαθεῖν

Post Reply