Introduction to tense and aspect

Lexicons, Grammars, Reading Guides, History, Culture, and Background
Michael Sharpnack
Posts: 31
Joined: February 2nd, 2017, 5:13 pm
Location: Nashville

Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Michael Sharpnack » May 12th, 2017, 3:08 pm

What would you recommend for a good introduction to the topic of tense and aspect in the Greek verb? I would like something readable and introductory level, as I am a beginner, and don't have really any understanding of it - or linguistics in general. Or, would you recommend I stay away from the topic..?

I found this thread: https://www.ibiblio.org/bgreek/forum/vi ... f=19&t=175, and read through it, but left feeling more confused...

Thanks,

MAubrey
Posts: 841
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: Washington
Contact:

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by MAubrey » May 12th, 2017, 6:01 pm

I would recommend Albert Rijksbaron's book as the best starting point:

The Syntax and Semantics of the Verb in Classical Greek: An Introduction: Third Edition

Most of the New Testament stuff that currently exists has too much baggage (we're trying to change that, but writing is slow).
Mike Aubrey, Linguist
Koine-Greek.com

Robert Emil Berge
Posts: 32
Joined: August 24th, 2016, 1:34 pm

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Robert Emil Berge » May 12th, 2017, 6:20 pm

I second MAubrey's suggestion. This is the best source I have seen for understanding how the Greek verbs work. It is systematic and clear about a topic which seems to be chaotic without any order to it. If you haven't yet learned about all the verb forms in whatever beginner's course you use, I would perhaps advice you to wait a bit before you read it. It is not a shortcut to the most basic stuff, and be careful not to be confused, since its approach is a bit different from most other treatments of the subject. But still, at the time when you have started learning about conditional clauses and such things it could be very helpful for understanding how tense and aspect actually work.

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3097
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Jonathan Robie » May 13th, 2017, 9:41 am

I third the suggestion.

I think Rijksbaron is clearer than most NT grammars on this subject. Unfortunately, his examples are from the classics, and may not be easy for beginners. If you start reading through Rijksbaron, I would be happy to generate sets of New Testament examples for whatever section you are reading at any given time, and we can discuss it here. I had started a discussion of Rijksbaron once upon a time, we could do it there.
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Eeli Kaikkonen
Posts: 378
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 7:49 am
Location: Finland
Contact:

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Eeli Kaikkonen » May 13th, 2017, 1:30 pm

We have a whole subforum dedicated to Rijksbaron, but it withered.

I wish Robert Binnick rewrote his Time and the Verb: A Guide to Tense and Aspect. Nowadays it's old, too expensive and probably hard to find. A 2nd edition would be required reading for theoretical base. Just look at the table of the contents (should be available in google books or amazon.com).

Michael Sharpnack
Posts: 31
Joined: February 2nd, 2017, 5:13 pm
Location: Nashville

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Michael Sharpnack » May 15th, 2017, 6:47 pm

Thanks for the suggestion. I just ordered the book; when I start reading it I'll let you know, and would love to discuss it on the subforum.
Robert Emil Berge wrote:
May 12th, 2017, 6:20 pm
If you haven't yet learned about all the verb forms in whatever beginner's course you use, I would perhaps advice you to wait a bit before you read it.
I have done a first year primer, and am halfway through Decker's reader now, but that's the extent of my knowledge.

Michael Sharpnack
Posts: 31
Joined: February 2nd, 2017, 5:13 pm
Location: Nashville

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Michael Sharpnack » May 15th, 2017, 11:12 pm

Also, how do you guys feel about Black's book: "Linguistics for Students of New Testament Greek"? I was thinking of picking that up as well.

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3097
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Jonathan Robie » May 16th, 2017, 10:46 am

Eeli Kaikkonen wrote:
May 13th, 2017, 1:30 pm
I wish Robert Binnick rewrote his Time and the Verb: A Guide to Tense and Aspect. Nowadays it's old, too expensive and probably hard to find. A 2nd edition would be required reading for theoretical base. Just look at the table of the contents (should be available in google books or amazon.com).
Is anyone familiar with The Oxford Book on Tense and Aspect, which Binnick edited? It was published in 2012.
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Stirling Bartholomew
Posts: 614
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Stirling Bartholomew » May 16th, 2017, 10:54 am

Michael Sharpnack wrote:
May 15th, 2017, 11:12 pm
Also, how do you guys feel about Black's book: "Linguistics for Students of New Testament Greek"? I was thinking of picking that up as well.
Somewhat overrated IMO. I like Black's works in general and find nothing wrong in the linguistics book but it doesn't get you very far into the discipline. If someone wants to explore linguistics some particular framework needs to be chosen as a starting point. My problem with linguistics is like Peter J Williams problem with the Septuagint. "There is no it."
C. Stirling Bartholomew

Eeli Kaikkonen
Posts: 378
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 7:49 am
Location: Finland
Contact:

Re: Introduction to tense and aspect

Post by Eeli Kaikkonen » May 16th, 2017, 10:56 am

Michael Sharpnack wrote:
May 15th, 2017, 11:12 pm
Also, how do you guys feel about Black's book: "Linguistics for Students of New Testament Greek"? I was thinking of picking that up as well.
It's not very useful. It's too old and too thin. There's not much linguistics in it. It's still nice secondary source for beginning Greek students but not necessary.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest