Conjunctions

Re: Conjunctions

Postby MAubrey » December 11th, 2012, 1:26 pm

Stirling Bartholomew wrote: Runge and Levinsohn are books on text linguistics. They cover conjunctions but from a framework that many NT greek people find strange and hard to digest.

Levinsohn isn't easy for NT people. That's true. But I'm at a complete loss as to how you could say that about Runge's book. From seasoned NT scholars to 2nd year Greek exegesis students I have only heard praised for its accessibility and clarity.
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 622
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: Conjunctions

Postby Stephen Carlson » December 11th, 2012, 1:32 pm

Stephanie Black's dissertation on conjunctions in Matthew impressed me. I recommend that.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1805
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Conjunctions

Postby Ronaldo Ghenov » December 12th, 2012, 3:21 pm

Stirling Bartholomew wrote:They cover conjunctions but from a framework that many NT greek people find strange and hard to digest. I've been reading Levinsohn for 15 years and he now makes sense.


Stirling, Could you elaborate on what you mean by "strange"?
Ronaldo Ghenov
 
Posts: 7
Joined: December 6th, 2012, 1:37 pm

Re: Conjunctions

Postby MAubrey » December 12th, 2012, 4:06 pm

Ronaldo Ghenov wrote:
Stirling Bartholomew wrote:They cover conjunctions but from a framework that many NT greek people find strange and hard to digest. I've been reading Levinsohn for 15 years and he now makes sense.


Stirling, Could you elaborate on what you mean by "strange"?

I'm not Stirling, but...

They use a different set of terminology than traditional Greek grammar. That's all. As I said above, Runge's book is extremely accessible for NT Greek students and scholars and goes to great lengths to make everything quite understandable. And that's because he's writing to that particular audience. He's trying to bridge the gap. Levinsohn's stuff is more difficult because he's writing primarily to an audience of linguists and translators in missions organizations like Wycliffe.
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 622
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Previous

Return to Grammars

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests