New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Bible Study software, Unicode, Fonts, Keyboards, creating Web pages in Greek, and other software issues.

New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby LukeMurphey » December 15th, 2012, 5:17 pm

I'm working on a new website with the objective or provided a modern interface to Greek works. I was hoping to get the word and get some feedback regarding features you would like to see.

I would like to offer many of the features available in apps such as Logos on a free website. The first version is available at http://textcritical.net/.

I'm adding work parsing at the moment and the ability to view the original languages and an English translation side-by-side.

Long-term plans including offering features such as:

  • eBook creation: ability to create eBooks of selected works. May provide the ability to make "reader's editions" that include the definitions and/or parsing of Greek words inline (e.g. "make me an ebook of Josephi Vita with definitions for all words that occur 10 times or less").
  • Vocabulary tool: that allows readers to view the most common words in a given text so that you can build up your vocabulary
  • Word use research: ability to do an analysis of a word to determine if the word or phrase is commonly used by the author or other authors, etc.
  • Crowd-sourced parsing: so that readers of the site can select sections of text and agree to provide parsing data beyond that which automated analysis can do (like associating pronouns to the subject/object).

Image
LukeMurphey
 
Posts: 7
Joined: December 15th, 2012, 4:51 pm

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby John Samson » December 22nd, 2012, 10:10 am

This looks great. Can't wait for the additions (particularly the word-search function).
John Samson
 
Posts: 3
Joined: December 12th, 2012, 7:31 pm

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby LukeMurphey » December 26th, 2012, 5:23 pm

I just uploaded the new version to the server which adds morphological parsing of Greek words. The parsing page is a little slow at the moment but performance will be improved soon once the database indexing is performed.
LukeMurphey
 
Posts: 7
Joined: December 15th, 2012, 4:51 pm

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby Nigel Chapman » November 4th, 2014, 3:12 pm

This is pretty slick. Mainly Python on the server side?
"When eras die their legacies are left to strange police." -- Clarence Day
Nigel Chapman | http://chapman.id.au
Nigel Chapman
 
Posts: 66
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 4:55 pm
Location: Sydney Australia

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby Nigel Chapman » November 4th, 2014, 3:39 pm

And a better question: What source are you using for glosses?
"When eras die their legacies are left to strange police." -- Clarence Day
Nigel Chapman | http://chapman.id.au
Nigel Chapman
 
Posts: 66
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 4:55 pm
Location: Sydney Australia

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby LukeMurphey » December 2nd, 2014, 7:52 pm

Sorry for the delay,I have been traveling.

The code is a combination of server-side and client-side. The server-side content is in Python using the Django framework. You can get the source-code here: http://lukemurphey.net/projects/ancient-text-reader/repository.

As for the glosses, I have a database of Greek words in the various forms. The site simply does a lookup for a given form in order to get the information for it. What is nice about this approach is that it allows the site to work with all works even if they don't include the parses within the work itself (almost none do).
LukeMurphey
 
Posts: 7
Joined: December 15th, 2012, 4:51 pm

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby TimNelson » December 2nd, 2014, 9:30 pm

Regarding the glosses, I suspect Nigel is asking "whence cometh the database".

Also, it might be useful to be able to annotate a work with all words that occur less than eg. 10 times in *another* work. For example, suppose I know all words that occur more than 10x in the New Testament (alas, I'm not there yet), and wanted to read Xenophon's Anabasis. I'd be able to get a version of the Anabasis which footnotes all words occurring less than 10x in the NT. That could be handy. That's not an "in a hurry" feature, just a "nice to have".
--
Tim Nelson
B. Sc. (Computer Science), M. Div. Looking for work (in computing or language-related jobs).
TimNelson
 
Posts: 61
Joined: October 17th, 2014, 11:04 pm
Location: Australia, Victoria, Geelong

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby cwconrad » December 3rd, 2014, 7:39 am

TimNelson wrote:Regarding the glosses, I suspect Nigel is asking "whence cometh the database".

Also, it might be useful to be able to annotate a work with all words that occur less than eg. 10 times in *another* work. For example, suppose I know all words that occur more than 10x in the New Testament (alas, I'm not there yet), and wanted to read Xenophon's Anabasis. I'd be able to get a version of the Anabasis which footnotes all words occurring less than 10x in the NT. That could be handy. That's not an "in a hurry" feature, just a "nice to have".

That sounds a bit odd; it does make me wonder how predictable it is that one will turn from any one item in Greek literature to any other item in Greek literature. I suppose that most BG participants who go on to read other Greek texts do start out with the GNT. I did too, but that was an accident; the following year I was reading Homer and then went on the year after that to read Aristotle and Sophocles. I would think that implementation of such a feature would require some sort of calculation of what's most likely to be read next. How random might that be? Consider the thread Stephen Hughes has started on what to read after Xenophon's Oeconomicus?
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
ὁ ἀναγινώσκων νοείτω
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1396
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby Jonathan Robie » December 3rd, 2014, 10:07 am

cwconrad wrote:
TimNelson wrote:Regarding the glosses, I suspect Nigel is asking "whence cometh the database".

Also, it might be useful to be able to annotate a work with all words that occur less than eg. 10 times in *another* work. For example, suppose I know all words that occur more than 10x in the New Testament (alas, I'm not there yet), and wanted to read Xenophon's Anabasis. I'd be able to get a version of the Anabasis which footnotes all words occurring less than 10x in the NT. That could be handy. That's not an "in a hurry" feature, just a "nice to have".

That sounds a bit odd; it does make me wonder how predictable it is that one will turn from any one item in Greek literature to any other item in Greek literature. I suppose that most BG participants who go on to read other Greek texts do start out with the GNT. I did too, but that was an accident; the following year I was reading Homer and then went on the year after that to read Aristotle and Sophocles. I would think that implementation of such a feature would require some sort of calculation of what's most likely to be read next. How random might that be? Consider the thread Stephen Hughes has started on what to read after Xenophon's Oeconomicus?


I would prefer glosses that adapt based on the vocabulary you, as an individual, have learned.

And perhaps each principal part should be treated as a separate word for this purpose? That's a thought I've been toying with ...
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1601
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: New website with ancient Greek works: TextCritical.net

Postby Jonathan Robie » December 3rd, 2014, 10:08 am

TimNelson wrote:Regarding the glosses, I suspect Nigel is asking "whence cometh the database".


Tim is echoing my mantra here: If you want to make something public, please publish the data. In source code control, e.g. github. With a public license, e.g. Creative Commons ...

"Your user interface is my silo".

The texts for Luke's site are available in source code control here:

http://svn.lukemurphey.net/textcritical.com/trunk/src/reader/test/

It looks like he is using the Perseus texts. Some of the glosses, at least, seem to be tucked away in his "analyses" file:

http://svn.lukemurphey.net/textcritical.com/trunk/src/reader/test/greek-analyses.txt

Perhaps that comes from Perseus as well?
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1601
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Next

Return to Software

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest