Greek 'meros'

The forum for those who still struggle with morphology, syntax, and idiom, or who wish to discuss basic questions about the meaning of Greek texts, syntax, or words.
Forum rules
This is not a place for students to ask for the answers to their homework assignments. Users who do that may be banned.

Greek 'meros'

Postby David Arnold » October 16th, 2013, 8:03 am

This is not an assignment question but a personal study question.

My work with Indigenous Peoples has led me to dissect 1 Cor 13:12. I am working through an understanding of the Greek word 'meros' in this passage. I see a reference to 'a part assigned' (Strong's). Am I stretching things to suggest that we are only assigned a part of God's full truth, this side of eternity. If so, could this be extrapolated to suggest that perhaps God has 'assigned a part' to different cultures and as we 'partner' inter-culturally, we share and learn a fuller truth.

Any input appreciated. Thanks
David Arnold
 
Posts: 2
Joined: October 16th, 2013, 8:00 am

Re: Greek 'meros'

Postby David Lim » October 23rd, 2013, 5:39 am

David Arnold wrote:My work with Indigenous Peoples has led me to dissect 1 Cor 13:12. I am working through an understanding of the Greek word 'meros' in this passage. I see a reference to 'a part assigned' (Strong's). Am I stretching things to suggest that we are only assigned a part of God's full truth, this side of eternity. If so, could this be extrapolated to suggest that perhaps God has 'assigned a part' to different cultures and as we 'partner' inter-culturally, we share and learn a fuller truth.

Sorry David, but we don't involve theology on B-Greek as we want to focus on what the Greek text itself probably means or can possibly mean. All the writer says is that at the present he sees through a mirror obscurely and knows (the truth) in part. In general "μερος" does not imply assignment (John 21:6, Acts 23:6,9, 1 Cor 11:18). In fact, just 2 verses before the one you are asking about makes it clear what "εκ μερους" means here. Also, I don't know what you may be referring to in Strong's, which actually says "in a wide application", but it is better to avoid Strong's dictionary as there are much better ones like LSJ, an old version of which is at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/mor ... ek#lexicon. Finally, I would like to caution against extrapolating anything at all, because we are far too likely to make mistakes in guessing the unobvious. :)
δαυιδ λιμ
David Lim
 
Posts: 822
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am


Return to Beginners Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron