Page 2 of 2

Re: Definition of ὁσος and where is it in the bible?

Posted: March 30th, 2015, 8:40 am
by cwconrad
Stephen Hughes wrote:ὁσος is one of those words where just learning an Engish definition is not enough. It fulfills a role in the sentence and needs to understood as part of the whole sentence. It is used in certain syntactical patterns rather than simply having a meaning of its own. Together with other words, it sets up the structure of what is being said.
In Modern Greek it seems to me it's more or less an all-purposes relative pronoun; it seems to me that even in the GNT it often has overtones of "all that" or "whatever" (+ verb -- with or without ἄν + subj.).

Re: Definition of ὁσος and where is it in the bible?

Posted: March 30th, 2015, 12:14 pm
by Stephen Hughes
In Modern Greek it seems to me it's more or less an all-purposes relative pronoun;
ὁποῖος is probably what you are thinking of. It was used in the katharevousa with the article as the relative. The standard Modern Greek is που.

Re: Definition of ὁσος and where is it in the bible?

Posted: March 30th, 2015, 12:20 pm
by cwconrad
Stephen Hughes wrote:
In Modern Greek it seems to me it's more or less an all-purposes relative pronoun;
ὀποῖος is probably what you are thinking of. It was used the katharevousa with the article as relative. The standard Modern Greek is που.
I stand corrected; that's where I usually stand.

Re: Definition of ὁσος and where is it in the bible?

Posted: March 30th, 2015, 12:27 pm
by Stephen Hughes
cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:
In Modern Greek it seems to me it's more or less an all-purposes relative pronoun;
ὀποῖος is probably what you are thinking of. It was used the katharevousa with the article as relative. The standard Modern Greek is που.
I stand corrected; that's where I usually stand.
没事。It's not a big deal.

Re: Definition of ὁσος and where is it in the bible?

Posted: March 30th, 2015, 7:48 pm
by Jacob Rhoden
Stephen Hughes wrote:ὁσος is one of those words where just learning an Engish definition is not enough. It fulfills a role in the sentence and needs to understood as part of the whole sentence. It is used in certain syntactical patterns rather than simply having a meaning of its own. Together with other words, it sets up the structure of what is being said.
Thanks Stephen, I suspected as much. For some words that seem a bit abstract/vague I am trying to start find sentences I can read that demonstrate usage of the word. (Something I wish the textbooks would do). At the moment finding sentences in the New Testament that demonstrate a word that I can fully understand are quite few, but it _seems_ possible most of the time.