Prepositions

How can I best learn new vocabulary items? What aids are there and what pitfalls should be avoided? How does a beginner learn to use a lexicon?

Prepositions

Postby Mike Burke Deactivated » November 4th, 2012, 12:33 am

What's the difference between the prepositions eÍpið and eÍn?

Is there any difference in meaning or usage?
Mike Burke Deactivated
 
Posts: 54
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:25 am

Re: Prepositions

Postby Stephen Carlson » November 4th, 2012, 4:41 am

Mike Burke wrote:What's the difference between the prepositions eÍpið and eÍn?

Is there any difference in meaning or usage?


Your Greek font is not coming through and the text is coming across as gibberish. Please use Unicode or a standard (i.e. B-Greek style) transliteration.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Prepositions

Postby Stephen Carlson » November 4th, 2012, 9:08 am

[mod note: I have moved this Beginners Forum / Vocabulary as this post does not deal with a specific text.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Prepositions

Postby Mike Burke Deactivated » November 4th, 2012, 11:08 am

Thank you.

What's the difference (if there is any difference) between Epi and En?
Mike Burke Deactivated
 
Posts: 54
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:25 am

Re: Prepositions

Postby Stephen Carlson » November 4th, 2012, 12:17 pm

Mike Burke wrote:What's the difference (if there is any difference) between Epi and En?


It depends. In some contexts they are as different as the difference between external (upon) and internal (in). In other contexts, not so much.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Prepositions

Postby David Lim » November 4th, 2012, 8:33 pm

Stephen Carlson wrote:
Mike Burke wrote:What's the difference (if there is any difference) between Epi and En?


It depends. In some contexts they are as different as the difference between external (upon) and internal (in). In other contexts, not so much.


I would also say that although there is almost always a difference between the prepositions "επι" and "εν", very often even a literal English translation cannot show an obvious distinction unless you analyze the surrounding context, because a large variety of English words have to be used to convey all the different possible usages of "επι". Usually though "εν" means "{ in / among (plural) } (in a location) / in (in reference to / in a period of time ) / { in / by } (by an indirect object). For more detail you should refer to a lexicon (like http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/mor ... ek#lexicon), or simply read more to get familiar with the common words like "επι" and "εν".
δαυιδ λιμ
David Lim
 
Posts: 880
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Re: Prepositions

Postby Mike Burke Deactivated » November 4th, 2012, 11:53 pm

David Lim wrote:
Stephen Carlson wrote:
Mike Burke wrote:What's the difference (if there is any difference) between Epi and En?


It depends. In some contexts they are as different as the difference between external (upon) and internal (in). In other contexts, not so much.


I would also say that although there is almost always a difference between the prepositions "επι" and "εν", very often even a literal English translation cannot show an obvious distinction unless you analyze the surrounding context, because a large variety of English words have to be used to convey all the different possible usages of "επι". Usually though "εν" means "{ in / among (plural) } (in a location) / in (in reference to / in a period of time ) / { in / by } (by an indirect object). For more detail you should refer to a lexicon (like http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/mor ... ek#lexicon), or simply read more to get familiar with the common words like "επι" and "εν".


Thank you both.

What about Eis?

Is it used more or less synonymously with En?
Mike Burke Deactivated
 
Posts: 54
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:25 am

Re: Prepositions

Postby Stephen Carlson » November 5th, 2012, 1:49 am

Hi Mike, the meaning of prepositions is highly context dependent. Sometimes different prepositions have distinct meanings; sometimes they overlap.
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Prepositions

Postby Barry Hofstetter » November 5th, 2012, 8:08 am

To answer the question a little more specifically, yes, there is a difference between εἰς and ἐν. εἰς is generally used with verbs of motion, ἐν with verbs of rest. During the time of the NT, there has been some semantic shift in the prepositions, and we see them used in ways surprising to someone who knows classical Greek before reading his NT. As Stephen pointed out, the usages of the prepositions are highly context dependent. Sometimes they are used in Greek in ways we wouldn't expect if we look first at the English, and sometimes the semantic range is such that the English demands a different preposition to translate that we don't expect in English. The only way to get a hold of this is to read lots of Greek and see the various prepositions in context. In modern languages, the use of prepositions can be most challenging to the student, and so for ancient languages as well.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Barry Hofstetter
 
Posts: 570
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm


Return to Vocabulary

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron