Textual variant in Acts 16:10

How can I best learn new vocabulary items? What aids are there and what pitfalls should be avoided? How does a beginner learn to use a lexicon?

Textual variant in Acts 16:10

Postby Wes Wood » February 15th, 2014, 7:03 pm

What is the lexical form of enohsamen? I am away from my resources. Thank you.
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 224
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

ἐνοήσαμεν for ἐζητήσαμεν... συμβιβάζοντες in Acts 16:10

Postby Stephen Hughes » February 15th, 2014, 9:30 pm

ἐνοήσαμεν "(at the end of thinking it out,) we intended to (+inf.)", << νοέω (νοϝέω)
ἐζητήσαμεν "we sought to (= tried to find a way to) (+inf.)" << ζητέω

ἐζητήσαμεν ... συμβιβάζοντες << συμβιβάζω"draw(ing) the conclusion", "think(ing) out logically"

That is to say, in my opinion, that ἐνοήσαμεν has the form (i.e. fits into the syntactic role) of ἐζητήσαμεν and has more the meaning of συμβιβάζοντες.
Last edited by Stephen Hughes on February 15th, 2014, 9:59 pm, edited 9 times in total.
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attributed to Albert Einstein)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1289
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Re: Textual variant in Acts 16:10

Postby Louis L Sorenson » February 15th, 2014, 9:34 pm

The NA27 text is

10 ὡς δὲ τὸ ὅραμα εἶδεν, εὐθέως ἐζητήσαμεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς Μακεδονίαν συμβιβάζοντες ὅτι προσκέκληται ἡμᾶς ὁ θεὸς εὐαγγελίσασθαι αὐτούς..


Laparola.net/greco has the following:

ὡς δὲ τὸ ὅραμα εἶδεν, εὐθέως ἐζητήσαμεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς Μακεδονίαν, συμβιβάζοντες ὅτι προσκέκληται ἡμᾶς ὁ θεὸς εὐαγγελίσασθαι αὐτούς.
Variant readings

16:10 (Münster)
ὡς δὲ τὸ ὅραμα εἶδεν, εὐθέως ἐζητήσαμεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς Μακεδονίαν, συμβιβάζοντες] WH
ὡς δὲ τὸ ὅραμα εἶδεν, εὐθέως ἐζητήσαμεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς τὴν Μακεδονίαν, συμβιβάζοντες] Byz ς
διεγερθεὶς οὖν διηγήσατο τὸ ὅραμα ἡμῖν, καὶ ἐνοήσαμεν] D (copsa)

θεὸς] p74 ‭א A B C E Ψ 33 36 81 181 307 326 453 610 630 945 1175 1678 1739 1891 2344 itar itdem ite itl itp itph itro itw vg copbo geo slavms Jerome Theophylactb WH NR CEI Riv TILC Nv NM
κύριος] D L P 049 056 0142 88 104 330 436 451 614 629 1241 1409 1505 1877 2127 2412 2492 2495 Byz l884 l1178 itc itd itgig syrp syrh copsa arm slavms Irenaeuslat Chrysostom Theophylacta ς ND Dio

αὐτούς] Byz ς WH
τοὺς ἐν τῇ Μακεδονίᾳ] D (copsa)


The notes in NA27 have D, which is really a masterful embellisher of the text (D goes above and beyond the written text clarifying, adding elucidations, dramatizing, etc. more than any other manuscript). The writer replaces the text "ὡς δὲ τὸ ὅραμα εἶδεν, εὐθέως ἐζητήσαμεν ἐξελθεῖν εἰς Μακεδονίαν συμβιβάζοντες" with
διεγερθεὶς οὖν διηγήσατο τὸ ὄραμα ἡμῖν καὶ ἐνοήσαμεν


The best way to check on forms you do not know is to use the Perseus hopper Greek word study tool: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph. The exact link for this word is http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=enohsamen&la=greek.
Louis L Sorenson
 
Posts: 588
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA

Re: Textual variant in Acts 16:10

Postby Wes Wood » February 15th, 2014, 9:55 pm

Thank you, both. For some reason, I have always struggled to remember this particular word.
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 224
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Re: Textual variant in Acts 16:10

Postby Stephen Hughes » February 15th, 2014, 10:14 pm

I had the same trouble with it too for a long time. In the end, I added an extra piece of "code" in my grammar-brain to handle words like this ἐνοήσαμεν, and ἐξηραμμένην (<< ξηραίνω "to become dry'). ἐπιστεύσαμεν is not so hard, because, as readers of Christian texts, we are more familiar with πιστ- as a root. A student of Classical Greek, however, would have the same type of confusion.
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attributed to Albert Einstein)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1289
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Re: Textual variant in Acts 16:10

Postby Wes Wood » February 15th, 2014, 10:25 pm

I might try that. I have been aware that I struggle more with verbs with short stems. Trying to learn Hebrew has also been difficult for me. I have wondered if these problems are related or coincidental.
"We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves."
-Galileo Galilei
Wes Wood
 
Posts: 224
Joined: September 20th, 2013, 8:18 pm

Dealing with uncertainty in language.

Postby Stephen Hughes » February 15th, 2014, 11:14 pm

Wes Wood wrote:I might try that. I have been aware that I struggle more with verbs with short stems. Trying to learn Hebrew has also been difficult for me. I have wondered if these problems are related or coincidental.

Learning any language means developing strategies for formulating a number of possibilities for the forms that we find in what we hear or read, and then hold onto those possibilities till the context makes it clear what the meaning is.

According to the way that you have probably learnt Greek, you will have to do that "manually" with your logical thinking either by making a translation to both possibilities then later dropping one of them, or by "parsing" into different forms then prefering one of those parses over the others at a later time.

That requires parallel processing of the language, and strategies for handling uncertainty. Things that are a normal part of language processing, but are not normally taught in dead-language classes.

My Hebrew is like when a learner driver "bunny-hops" (jumps the car forward a little, while managing to stall it), so I couldn't really help you much on the Hebrew side of things. You could ask that on the B-Hebrew forum - the Beginners forum is down the bottom of the list. With an enquiry like yours you could formulate a question like, "Are there any Hebrew forms that are easily / regularly confused with forms from different roots?"
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attributed to Albert Einstein)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1289
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

D's paraphrase and embellishment as a way to Greek

Postby Stephen Hughes » February 15th, 2014, 11:25 pm

Louis L Sorenson wrote:... D, ... [who] is really a masterful embellisher of the text ... [going] above and beyond the written text clarifying, adding elucidations, dramatizing, etc. more than any other ...

It seems that if I want to improve my skills in understanding Greek in terms of itself, and then for paraphrasing Greek in Greek rather than referring to English to express its meaning, it might be well for me to work through D's work.

Aside from D and the Fathers are their other sources for paraphrase and embellishment?

Do you have an online reference for D's manuscript?
Stephen Hughes
"If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself."
(Attributed to Albert Einstein)
Stephen Hughes
 
Posts: 1289
Joined: February 26th, 2013, 7:12 am
Location: China

Re: Dealing with uncertainty in language.

Postby RandallButh » February 16th, 2014, 3:48 am

Stephen Hughes wrote:
Wes Wood wrote:I might try that. I have been aware that I struggle more with verbs with short stems. Trying to learn Hebrew has also been difficult for me. I have wondered if these problems are related or coincidental.

Learning any language means developing strategies for formulating a number of possibilities for the forms that we find in what we hear or read, and then hold onto those possibilities till the context makes it clear what the meaning is.

According to the way that you have probably learnt Greek, you will have to do that "manually" with your logical thinking either by making a translation to both possibilities then later dropping one of them, or by "parsing" into different forms then prefering one of those parses over the others at a later time.

That requires parallel processing of the language, and strategies for handling uncertainty. Things that are a normal part of language processing, but are not normally taught in dead-language classes.


It helps to keep real words central to the learning process and connected to actual meaning and reference. Ancient languages are too easily extracted into artificial systems, a layer removed from the actual language. Unfortunately, such artificiality is drilled into students by pedagogies that typically follow some kind of analysis but are against the way that the human brain works.

As a first hint for reworking this and starting to recognize the artificial processes of much pedagogy, consider Greek verbs. You want to learn a word like νοεῖν? First, note that I've listed a real word, not a stem to which a rule must be applied. Humans first learn real words, only afterwards do they learn to extract stems/roots, etc. However, I would not consider being acquainted with νοεῖν until I also knew νοῆσαι. I think of the word as [ νοῆσαι νοεῖν ]. And like the advice that you may have heard when expanding your English vocabulary, you need to use it several times yourself. You must ask yourself τἰ ἐνόησα; As for lexical form, the non-Ionic Greeks would call "I understand/am mindful" νοῶ not *νοέω.
the same is true for Hebrew. Use real words: אני משליך אבן ani mashlix even "I am throwing a stone" hishlaxti even "I threw a stone." It is actually a pedagogical crime to teach students this word/verb as " *shalaka, 'throw', hif`il" If you have the chance, try to find a way to visit the ΒΗ ulpan in NorthCarolina this summer (Biblical Language Center). You will start to feel what it means to grow a language inside you.
RandallButh
 
Posts: 597
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: D's paraphrase and embellishment as a way to Greek

Postby Stirling Bartholomew » February 16th, 2014, 8:11 am

Stephen Hughes wrote:
Louis L Sorenson wrote:... D, ... [who] is really a masterful embellisher of the text ... [going] above and beyond the written text clarifying, adding elucidations, dramatizing, etc. more than any other ...


Do you have an online reference for D's manuscript?


Transcription of D with links to images of the manuscript:
Codex Bezae: Cambridge, University Library: Nn.2.41
http://epapers.bham.ac.uk/1663/1/Bezae%2DGreek.xml#top
C. Stirling Bartholomew
Stirling Bartholomew
 
Posts: 212
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Next

Return to Vocabulary

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest