Athenaze

I don't understand what my textbook is saying about X. Can someone help me?

Athenaze

Postby Mark Trzasko » December 30th, 2011, 3:45 pm

Is anyone studying Greek from Athenaze, Book 1?
Mark Trzasko
 
Posts: 15
Joined: June 5th, 2011, 9:41 am

Re: Athenaze

Postby Barry Hofstetter » December 31st, 2011, 8:12 am

I am using it as a supplementary textbook for my Greek students, actually.
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Barry Hofstetter
 
Posts: 637
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Athenaze

Postby Jason Hare » December 31st, 2011, 8:49 am

I finished book 1, but I wouldn't mind a refresher from it. Are you asking for people to join you in study? What are you asking about?
Jason A. Hare
Rehovot, Israel
Jason Hare
 
Posts: 379
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Re: Athenaze

Postby Mark Trzasko » December 31st, 2011, 7:36 pm

I had a question concerning the story on page 25 (the Second Edition). The Greek word for "possible" is in the neuter case in the sentence of line 14, "For it is possible to lift the stone." Is it neuter because "it" is considered to be impersonal?
Mark Trzasko
 
Posts: 15
Joined: June 5th, 2011, 9:41 am

Re: Athenaze

Postby Jason Hare » January 1st, 2012, 7:30 pm

Mark Trzasko wrote:I had a question concerning the story on page 25 (the Second Edition). The Greek word for "possible" is in the neuter case in the sentence of line 14, "For it is possible to lift the stone." Is it neuter because "it" is considered to be impersonal?


The phrase in question is:

δυνατὸν γάρ ἐστιν αἴρειν τὸν λίθον.
For it is impossible to lift the stone.

The agreement would be with the infinitive itself.

From Smyth (§1985):
1985. Such quasi-impersonal verbs and expressions are δεῖ it is necessary, χρή (properly a substantive with ἐστί omitted, 793) it is necessary, δοκεῖ it seems good, ἔστι it is possible, ἔξεστι it is in one's power, οἷόν τέ ἐστι it is possible, πρέπει and προσήκει it is fitting, συμβαίνει it happens; and many expressions formed by ἐστί and a predicate noun, as ἄξιον it is right, δίκαιον it is just, ἀναγκαῖον it is necessary, δυνατόν it is possible, ἀδύνατον (or ἀδύνατα) it is impossible, αἰσχρόν it is disgraceful, καλόν it is honourable, ὥρα and καιρός it is time. With the last two expressions the old dative use of the infinitive is clear: ὥρα βουλεύεσθαι it is time for considering P. Soph. 241b.


Since the "infinitive was originally a verbal noun in the dative... case" (Smyth §1969), it appears with the neuter article (Smyth §1968.b.) and also with neuter descriptors. It's also logical since it is neither masculine nor feminine in concept. Maybe someone else will be able to provide a better explanation, but this is what I found in Smyth.

Hope it helps!

Jason
Jason A. Hare
Rehovot, Israel
Jason Hare
 
Posts: 379
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Re: Athenaze

Postby Mark Trzasko » January 1st, 2012, 8:55 pm

Jason, thanks for your help!
Mark Trzasko
 
Posts: 15
Joined: June 5th, 2011, 9:41 am

Re: Athenaze

Postby Mark Trzasko » January 2nd, 2012, 9:29 am

On page 31 of Athenaze, line 9 has, "Dig the stones and carry out out of the field." Why does Greek have a redundant preposition?
Mark Trzasko
 
Posts: 15
Joined: June 5th, 2011, 9:41 am

Re: Athenaze

Postby Jason Hare » January 2nd, 2012, 4:32 pm

Mark Trzasko wrote:On page 31 of Athenaze, line 9 has, "Dig the stones and carry out out of the field." Why does Greek have a redundant preposition?


Again, it's better if you provide the Greek lines that you're referring to.

In this case:
σκάπτε τοὺς λίθους καὶ ἔκφερε ἐκ τοῦ ἀγροῦ.
Dig the stones and carry [them] out of the field.

You will come to see that prepositions attached to verbs are frequently repeated with their objects. This seems redundant in English, but it isn't really the case in Greek.

In English, the verb "enter" implies the preposition "into." Thus, we say "enter the house" in equivalence to "go in(to) the house." Yet, there are those who might say that someone "entered into the house." This is slightly redundant, but it isn't against the feeling of the sentence.

The same is true in Greek, in which you might say that someone εἰσβαίνει εἰς τὸν οἶκον "enters (into) the house." You shouldn't take it as redundant but as a feature of Greek. It's very common.
Jason A. Hare
Rehovot, Israel
Jason Hare
 
Posts: 379
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Re: Athenaze

Postby Mark Trzasko » January 2nd, 2012, 8:13 pm

Thanks Jason. Which program do you use to type out the Greek lettering?
Mark Trzasko
 
Posts: 15
Joined: June 5th, 2011, 9:41 am

Re: Athenaze

Postby Jason Hare » January 2nd, 2012, 8:35 pm

I have Windows 7, and I use the standard Polytonic Greek keyboard layout that comes with the system.
Jason A. Hare
Rehovot, Israel
Jason Hare
 
Posts: 379
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Next

Return to Textbooks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest