Acts 17:22 STAQEIS, pass. part., translated as act.

How do I work out the meaning of a Greek text? How can I best understand the forms and vocabulary in this particular text?
Forum rules
This is a beginner's forum - see the Koine Greek forum for more advanced discussion of Greek texts. Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up.

Re: Acts 17:22 STAQEIS, pass. part., translated as act.

Postby David Lim » May 8th, 2012, 11:45 am

cwconrad wrote:(a) One should distinguish carefully between ἵσταμαι, στήσομαι, ἔστην/ἐστάθην, ἕστηκα (intransitive in sense "come to a stand" or "come to a halt", and ἵστημι, στήσω, ἔστησα (causative in the sense "make stand" or bring to a standstill".


Thanks! Does it mean that "εστησαν" could be either "εστη + σαν" (intransitive) or "εστησα + ν" (transitive)? For example:
Intransitive:
[Luke 17:12] και εισερχομενου αυτου εις τινα κωμην απηντησαν αυτω δεκα λεπροι ανδρες οι εστησαν πορρωθεν
[Rev 18:17] οτι μια ωρα ηρημωθη ο τοσουτος πλουτος και πας κυβερνητης και πας ο επι τοπον πλεων και ναυται και οσοι την θαλασσαν εργαζονται απο μακροθεν εστησαν
Transitive:
[Acts 5:27] αγαγοντες δε αυτους εστησαν εν τω συνεδριω και επηρωτησεν αυτους ο αρχιερευς
δαυιδ λιμ
David Lim
 
Posts: 885
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Re: Acts 17:22 STAQEIS, pass. part., translated as act.

Postby cwconrad » May 8th, 2012, 3:12 pm

David Lim wrote:
cwconrad wrote:(a) One should distinguish carefully between ἵσταμαι, στήσομαι, ἔστην/ἐστάθην, ἕστηκα (intransitive in sense "come to a stand" or "come to a halt", and ἵστημι, στήσω, ἔστησα (causative in the sense "make stand" or bring to a standstill".


Thanks! Does it mean that "εστησαν" could be either "εστη + σαν" (intransitive) or "εστησα + ν" (transitive)? For example:
Intransitive:
[Luke 17:12] και εισερχομενου αυτου εις τινα κωμην απηντησαν αυτω δεκα λεπροι ανδρες οι εστησαν πορρωθεν
[Rev 18:17] οτι μια ωρα ηρημωθη ο τοσουτος πλουτος και πας κυβερνητης και πας ο επι τοπον πλεων και ναυται και οσοι την θαλασσαν εργαζονται απο μακροθεν εστησαν
Transitive:
[Acts 5:27] αγαγοντες δε αυτους εστησαν εν τω συνεδριω και επηρωτησεν αυτους ο αρχιερευς


Yes, it does, but I think that context (as ordinarily) will make it clear which any particular instance is in fact. Here it's abundantly clear that ἔστησαν is intransitive in Lk 17:12 and Rev 18:17, whereas in Act 5:27 it is causative.
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
… ἐπειδὴ καὶ τὸν οἶνον ἠξίους
πίνειν, συνεκποτέ’ ἐστί σοι καὶ τὴν τρύγα Aristophanes, Plutus 1085
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1269
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714

Re: Acts 17:22 STAQEIS, pass. part., translated as act.

Postby David Lim » May 9th, 2012, 1:50 am

cwconrad wrote:
David Lim wrote:
cwconrad wrote:(a) One should distinguish carefully between ἵσταμαι, στήσομαι, ἔστην/ἐστάθην, ἕστηκα (intransitive in sense "come to a stand" or "come to a halt", and ἵστημι, στήσω, ἔστησα (causative in the sense "make stand" or bring to a standstill".


Thanks! Does it mean that "εστησαν" could be either "εστη + σαν" (intransitive) or "εστησα + ν" (transitive)? For example:
Intransitive:
[Luke 17:12] και εισερχομενου αυτου εις τινα κωμην απηντησαν αυτω δεκα λεπροι ανδρες οι εστησαν πορρωθεν
[Rev 18:17] οτι μια ωρα ηρημωθη ο τοσουτος πλουτος και πας κυβερνητης και πας ο επι τοπον πλεων και ναυται και οσοι την θαλασσαν εργαζονται απο μακροθεν εστησαν
Transitive:
[Acts 5:27] αγαγοντες δε αυτους εστησαν εν τω συνεδριω και επηρωτησεν αυτους ο αρχιερευς


Yes, it does, but I think that context (as ordinarily) will make it clear which any particular instance is in fact. Here it's abundantly clear that ἔστησαν is intransitive in Lk 17:12 and Rev 18:17, whereas in Act 5:27 it is causative.


Yup it is clear of course. I was just confirming because LSJ only listed "εστησαν" as "verb 3rd pl aor ind act" and not also as "verb 3rd pl aor ind act causal", though it does list "εστησα", "εστησαμεν", "εστησας", "εστησατε" and "εστησε[ν]" as causal. Thanks!
δαυιδ λιμ
David Lim
 
Posts: 885
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Previous

Return to What does this text mean?

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest