Variations of Vocabulary

How do I work out the meaning of a Greek text? How can I best understand the forms and vocabulary in this particular text?
Forum rules
This is a beginner's forum - see the Koine Greek forum for more advanced discussion of Greek texts. Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up.

When answering questions in this forum, keep it simple, and aim your responses to the level of the person asking the question.
Post Reply
mrunion28
Posts: 1
Joined: March 28th, 2018, 1:18 pm

Variations of Vocabulary

Post by mrunion28 » March 28th, 2018, 1:23 pm

I have been studying 1 Corinthians 1 for a while (specifically v.26-31). I have been baffled by the alternate use of the word "Moros" (μωρός) in simple translations but the variant "Mora" (μωρά) is sometimes used. Is there a significance to this? If so, what is it? What is the difference between the root and the variant? I am a very new student so please pardon my ignorance... I am simply anxious to learn!
0 x



Stirling Bartholomew
Posts: 959
Joined: August 9th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Re: Variations of Vocabulary

Post by Stirling Bartholomew » March 28th, 2018, 2:57 pm

mrunion28 wrote:
March 28th, 2018, 1:23 pm
I have been studying 1 Corinthians 1 for a while (specifically v.26-31). I have been baffled by the alternate use of the word "Moros" (μωρός) in simple translations but the variant "Mora" (μωρά) is sometimes used. Is there a significance to this? If so, what is it? What is the difference between the root and the variant? I am a very new student so please pardon my ignorance... I am simply anxious to learn!
Greek is an inflected language. The nouns and adjectives have various endings that indicate gender, case, and number.

Neuter nominative & accusative cases share the same form.

τὸ μωρὸν adj nom/acc neuter singular
τὰ μωρ adj nom/acc neuter plural
0 x
C. Stirling Bartholomew

Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1628
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: Variations of Vocabulary

Post by Barry Hofstetter » March 29th, 2018, 9:36 am

Just to follow up on Stirling's response, "inflection" means that the form of the word changes in order to express it's grammatical/syntactical relationship to the rest of the sentence. Nouns, adjectives and verbs do this in Greek (prepositions, particles, adverbs and conjunctions do not). You might want to start with a beginning grammar and begin working through it to get the sense of how the language works (which is quite different from English).
0 x
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Χαίρετε ἐν κυρίῳ πάντοτε· πάλιν ἐρῶ, χαίρετε

Shirley Rollinson
Posts: 337
Joined: June 4th, 2011, 6:19 pm
Location: New Mexico
Contact:

Re: Variations of Vocabulary

Post by Shirley Rollinson » March 29th, 2018, 7:49 pm

mrunion28 wrote:
March 28th, 2018, 1:23 pm
I have been studying 1 Corinthians 1 for a while (specifically v.26-31). I have been baffled by the alternate use of the word "Moros" (μωρός) in simple translations but the variant "Mora" (μωρά) is sometimes used. Is there a significance to this? If so, what is it? What is the difference between the root and the variant? I am a very new student so please pardon my ignorance... I am simply anxious to learn!
μωρός is an adjective - if it is describing a noun which is grammatically masculine, it will use a masculine set of endings (depending on whether the noun is the subject of the sentence (Nominative, -ος), or the object (Accusative, -ον), or an indirect object (Dative, - to, for, by, with, from, in, -ῳ) or a Genitive, -ου. And there are endings to go with plurals, and another set to go with nouns which are grammatically neuter, and another set to go with nouns which are grammatically feminine. It sounds intimidating, but it isn't really - and they give information on how things fit together in a sentence.
So μωρός should be linked to a noun which is grammatically masculine and Nominative singular.
τα μωρα is a neuter plural, either nominative or accusative, so implies "things" rather than people. Similarly το μωρον (1 Cor. 1:25) is neuter singular, either nominative or accusative, so implies just one "thing" rather than a person.
If you'd like to delve into Greek a bit more deeply, you're welcome to try the online Greek textbook, starting at
http://www.drshirley.org/greek/textbook02/contents.html
I hope this helps,
Shirley Rollinson
0 x

Post Reply

Return to “What does this text mean?”