In that Day

How do I work out the meaning of a Greek text? How can I best understand the forms and vocabulary in this particular text?
Forum rules
This is a beginner's forum - see the Koine Greek forum for more advanced discussion of Greek texts. Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up.

When answering questions in this forum, keep it simple, and aim your responses to the level of the person asking the question.
Post Reply
sethknorr
Posts: 10
Joined: March 14th, 2018, 11:19 pm
Contact:

In that Day

Post by sethknorr » April 6th, 2018, 11:30 pm

In English we may say, "I can't wait to go to the beach, because I'm going to swim." Or we may say (although rare) "I can't wait to go to the beach, on that day I'm going to swim." However, we would never say, "I can't wait to go to the beach, in that day I'm going to swim."

So why do some modern translations that speak of a singular future day still use the phrase "in that day?" Is it simply keeping the KJV tradition or for some other reason? It seems like this could be confusing to readers because it almost seems like they are inferring a span of time, whereas it is just one singular day.

For instance, Luke 10:12 NASB has "in that day" for the phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
Some translations like the HCSB translate it as "on that day."

But it seems like translations are inconsistent on how it is translated.

For instance in 2 Thessalonians 1:10 the exact same phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
NASB translates "on that day" and HCSB "in that day", a reverse of both!

Is there any other reason for this, other than KJV tradition? Any insights on this?

Thanks,

Seth Knorr
0 x


Seth Knorr
I always wondered what Greeks think when they see that commercial "λέγω μου Ἐγὼ"

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3491
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: In that Day

Post by Jonathan Robie » April 7th, 2018, 10:20 am

sethknorr wrote:
April 6th, 2018, 11:30 pm
For instance, Luke 10:12 NASB has "in that day" for the phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
Some translations like the HCSB translate it as "on that day."

But it seems like translations are inconsistent on how it is translated.

For instance in 2 Thessalonians 1:10 the exact same phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
NASB translates "on that day" and HCSB "in that day", a reverse of both!

Is there any other reason for this, other than KJV tradition? Any insights on this?
If I understand you correctly, this isn't really a question of what “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ” means, you are making the point that the more common English idiom is "on that day" rather than "in that day"? That's true. My guess is that some very literal translations prefer to translate ἐν as "in" when possible. But that's just a guess.
1 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Jacob Rhoden
Posts: 145
Joined: February 15th, 2013, 8:16 am
Location: Greenville, South Carolina
Contact:

Re: In that Day

Post by Jacob Rhoden » September 4th, 2018, 5:10 pm

I wonder if usage of ‘In’ vs ‘on’ might hen an attempt to communicate a subtlety different meaning. I.e. on that day. Vs in those days. (Day referring to a specific day or a general era)

https://www.englishforums.com/English/I ... p/post.htm
1 x

Barry Hofstetter
Posts: 1336
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:48 pm

Re: In that Day

Post by Barry Hofstetter » September 4th, 2018, 9:24 pm

Jonathan Robie wrote:
April 7th, 2018, 10:20 am

If I understand you correctly, this isn't really a question of what “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ” means, you are making the point that the more common English idiom is "on that day" rather than "in that day"? That's true. My guess is that some very literal translations prefer to translate ἐν as "in" when possible. But that's just a guess.
I think that's right. I think it also depends on how much coffee the translator had. Yes, thorough knowledge of the languages, background and culture is almost as important as coffee in translation work.
0 x
N.E. Barry Hofstetter
Instructor of Latin
Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy
Χαίρετε ἐν κυρίῳ πάντοτε· πάλιν ἐρῶ, χαίρετε

Post Reply