Page 1 of 1

In that Day

Posted: April 6th, 2018, 11:30 pm
by sethknorr
In English we may say, "I can't wait to go to the beach, because I'm going to swim." Or we may say (although rare) "I can't wait to go to the beach, on that day I'm going to swim." However, we would never say, "I can't wait to go to the beach, in that day I'm going to swim."

So why do some modern translations that speak of a singular future day still use the phrase "in that day?" Is it simply keeping the KJV tradition or for some other reason? It seems like this could be confusing to readers because it almost seems like they are inferring a span of time, whereas it is just one singular day.

For instance, Luke 10:12 NASB has "in that day" for the phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
Some translations like the HCSB translate it as "on that day."

But it seems like translations are inconsistent on how it is translated.

For instance in 2 Thessalonians 1:10 the exact same phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
NASB translates "on that day" and HCSB "in that day", a reverse of both!

Is there any other reason for this, other than KJV tradition? Any insights on this?

Thanks,

Seth Knorr

Re: In that Day

Posted: April 7th, 2018, 10:20 am
by Jonathan Robie
sethknorr wrote:
April 6th, 2018, 11:30 pm
For instance, Luke 10:12 NASB has "in that day" for the phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
Some translations like the HCSB translate it as "on that day."

But it seems like translations are inconsistent on how it is translated.

For instance in 2 Thessalonians 1:10 the exact same phrase “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ”
NASB translates "on that day" and HCSB "in that day", a reverse of both!

Is there any other reason for this, other than KJV tradition? Any insights on this?
If I understand you correctly, this isn't really a question of what “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ” means, you are making the point that the more common English idiom is "on that day" rather than "in that day"? That's true. My guess is that some very literal translations prefer to translate ἐν as "in" when possible. But that's just a guess.

Re: In that Day

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 5:10 pm
by Jacob Rhoden
I wonder if usage of ‘In’ vs ‘on’ might hen an attempt to communicate a subtlety different meaning. I.e. on that day. Vs in those days. (Day referring to a specific day or a general era)

https://www.englishforums.com/English/I ... p/post.htm

Re: In that Day

Posted: September 4th, 2018, 9:24 pm
by Barry Hofstetter
Jonathan Robie wrote:
April 7th, 2018, 10:20 am

If I understand you correctly, this isn't really a question of what “ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ἐκείνῃ” means, you are making the point that the more common English idiom is "on that day" rather than "in that day"? That's true. My guess is that some very literal translations prefer to translate ἐν as "in" when possible. But that's just a guess.
I think that's right. I think it also depends on how much coffee the translator had. Yes, thorough knowledge of the languages, background and culture is almost as important as coffee in translation work.