Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Jonathan Robie » May 29th, 2012, 12:26 pm

Here's an old post from Dave Black's blog:

David Black wrote:The latest issue of The Reader’s Digest has an interesting article entitled “13 Things Used Car Salesmen Won’t Tell You.” Here are “13 Things Your Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You”:

1. Greek is not the only tool you need to interpret your New Testament. In fact, it’s only one component in a panoply of a myriad of tools. Get Greek, but don’t stop there. (You’ll need, for example, a Hebrew New Testament as well.)

2. Greek is not the Open Sesame of biblical interpretation. All it does is limit your options. It tells you what’s possible, then the context and other factors kick in to disambiguate the text.

3. Greek is not superior to other languages in the world. Don’t believe it when you are told that Greek is more logical than, say, Hebrew. Not true.

4. Greek had to be the language in which God inscripturated New Testament truth because of its complicated syntax. Truth be told, there’s only one reason why the New Testament was written in Greek and not in another language (say, Latin), and that is a man named Alexander the Great, whose vision was to conquer the inhabited world and then unite it through a process known as Hellenization. To a large degree he succeeded, and therefore the use of Greek as the common lingua franca throughout the Mediterranean world in the first century AD should come as no surprise to us today. I emphasize this point only because there are some today who would seek to resurrect the notion of “Holy Ghost” Greek. Their view is, in my view, a demonstrable cul-de-sac.

5. Greek words do not have one meaning. Yet how many times do we hear in a sermon, “The word in the Greek means…”? Most Greek words are polysemous, that is, they have many possible meanings, only one of which is its semantic contribution to any passage in which it occurs. (In case you were wondering: Reading all of the meanings of a Greek word into any particular passage in which it occurs is called “illegitimate totality transfer” by linguists.)

6. Greek is not difficult to learn. I’ll say it again: Greek is not difficult to learn. I like to tell my students, “Greek is an easy language; it’s us Greek teachers who get in the way.” The point is that anyone can learn Greek, even a poorly-educated surfer from Hawaii. If I can master Greek, anyone can!

7. Greek can be acquired through any number of means, including most beginning textbooks. Yes, I prefer to use my own Learn to Read New Testament Greek in my classes, but mine is not the only good textbook out there. When I was in California I taught in an institution that required all of its Greek teachers to use the same textbook for beginning Greek. I adamantly opposed that policy. I feel very strongly that teachers should have the right to use whichever textbook they prefer. Thankfully, the year I left California to move to North Carolina that policy was reversed, and now teachers can select their own beginning grammars. (By the way, the textbook that had been required was mine!)

8. Greek students think they can get away with falling behind in their studies. Folks, you can’t. I tell my students that it’s almost impossible to catch up if you get behind even one chapter in our textbook. Language study requires discipline and time management skills perhaps more than any other course of study in school.

9. Greek is fun! At least when it’s taught in a fun way.

10. Greek is good for more than word studies. In fact, in the past few years I’ve embarked on a crusade to get my students to move away from word-bound exegesis. When I was in seminary I was taught little more than how to do word studies from the Greek. Hence, I thought I had “used Greek in ministry” if I had consulted my Wuest, Robertson, Kittle, Brown, Vincent, or Vines. Since then I’ve discovered that lexical analysis is the handmaiden and not the queen of New Testament exegesis. Greek enables us to see how a text is structured, how it includes rhetorical devices, how syntactical constructions are often hermeneutical keys, etc.

11. Greek can cause you to lose your faith. It happened to one famous New Testament professor in the US when he discovered that there were textual variants in his Greek New Testament, and it can happen to you. When the text of Scripture becomes nothing more than “another analyzable datum of linguistic interpretation” then it loses its power as the Word of God. That’s why I’m so excited about my Greek students at the seminary, most of whom are eager to place their considerable learning at the feet of Jesus in humble service to His upside-down kingdom.

12. Greek can be learned in an informal setting. The truth is that you do not need to take a formal class in this subject or in any subject for that matter. I know gobs of homeschoolers who are using my grammar in self-study, many of whom are also using my Greek DVDs in the process. If anyone wants to join the club, let me know and I will send you, gratis, a pronunciation CD and a handout called “Additional Exercises.”

13. Greek is not Greek. In other words, Modern Greek and Koine Greek are two quite different languages. So don’t expect to be able to order a burrito in Athens just because you’ve had me for first year Greek. On the other hand, once you have mastered Koine Greek it is fairly easy to work backwards (and learn Classical Greek) and forwards (and learn Modern Greek).

Okay, I’m done. And yes, I’m exaggerating. Many Greek teachers do in fact tell their students these things. May their tribe increase!

Now who wants to tackle “13 Things Your Hebrew Teachers Won’t Tell You”?


The only bit I don't quite get is this:

(You’ll need, for example, a Hebrew New Testament as well.)


I don't see why anyone would need a Hebrew New Testament ...
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1302
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Stephen Carlson » May 29th, 2012, 12:32 pm

Could it be a typo/thinko for Hebrew Old Testament?
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1667
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby James Ernest » May 29th, 2012, 11:18 pm

I vote for "Greek Old Testament"
-------------------------------------------
James D. Ernest, PhD
Senior Acquisitions Editor
Baker Academic and Brazos Press
Grand Rapids, MI
-------------------------------------------
James Ernest
 
Posts: 36
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 1:26 pm

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby David Lim » May 30th, 2012, 1:33 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:[...]

The only bit I don't quite get is this:

(You’ll need, for example, a Hebrew New Testament as well.)


I don't see why anyone would need a Hebrew New Testament ...


Perhaps he is referring to the hypothesis that the original version of the good tidings according to Matthew was actually in the Hebrew dialect, and hence one should have a Hebrew New Testament at least for that.
δαυιδ λιμ
David Lim
 
Posts: 822
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby RandallButh » May 30th, 2012, 1:36 am


I don't see why anyone would need a Hebrew New Testament ...


You're right, Jonathan. They only need the skill to generate a Hebrew NT on the fly.
When the NT field has that skill, things will change, at least in gospel and historical Jesus studies.
RandallButh
 
Posts: 522
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Lee Moses » May 30th, 2012, 11:35 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:The only bit I don't quite get is this:

(You’ll need, for example, a Hebrew New Testament as well.)


I don't see why anyone would need a Hebrew New Testament ...


I've heard that statement more than once before, and have never understood the reasoning behind it. I have a Hebrew NT on my Bible software, and find it a helpful tool from time to time--but necessary? I just don't see it.
Lee Moses
 
Posts: 17
Joined: June 1st, 2011, 4:09 pm

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Louis L Sorenson » May 30th, 2012, 11:58 am

Aaron Eby, a student of mine, has worked with some others to bring the Delitsch Gospels back into print. http://vineofdavid.org/resources/dhe/
Louis L Sorenson
 
Posts: 565
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Jonathan Robie » May 31st, 2012, 7:07 am

I sent Dave Black an email, and he confirms that he does mean a Hebrew New Testament:

Dave Black wrote:No, you were correct, Jonathan. I have both the Delitzsch and the "Good News" editions of the Hebrew NT. I find these useful especially in the Gospels, which are steeped in Semitisms. Incidentally, I wrote a piece for The Bible Translator called "New Testament Semitisms" which you are most welcome to.


I have a copy of that article now. I'll start discussion of it in another thread.
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1302
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby Stephen Carlson » May 31st, 2012, 8:26 am

Jonathan Robie wrote:I sent Dave Black an email, and he confirms that he does mean a Hebrew New Testament:


So much for our attempts at conjectural emendation!
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D. (Duke)
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala
Stephen Carlson
 
Posts: 1667
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Uppsala University

Re: Dave Black on What Greek Teachers Won’t Tell You

Postby RandallButh » May 31st, 2012, 8:57 am

Stephen Carlson wrote:
Jonathan Robie wrote:I sent Dave Black an email, and he confirms that he does mean a Hebrew New Testament:


So much for our attempts at conjectural emendation!


at least you didn't emend my comment:

They only need the skill to generate a Hebrew NT on the fly.
When the NT field has that skill, things will change, at least in gospel and historical Jesus studies.


When gospel studies demand fluency in Hebrew the field will change. Comments like Kloppenborg's dismissal of the wordplay "ben/even" in the parable of the vineyard because it can't be done in Aramaic will be a quaint historical footnote 'about gospels studies once upon a time.' See now, Fassberg's survey CBQ April 2012.
RandallButh
 
Posts: 522
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Next

Return to Other

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests