How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek?

Grammar questions which are not related to any specific text.
Post Reply
David Ting
Posts: 24
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:32 am

How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek?

Post by David Ting » August 6th, 2011, 12:18 pm

I would like to translate "My commandment in righteous". I have come to two translations and don't know which one is right.

δικαιη ἡ ἐντολη μου.
ἡ ἐντολη μου ἐστιν δικαιη.

Your help is much appreciated.
0 x



Mark Lightman
Posts: 300
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:30 pm

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by Mark Lightman » August 6th, 2011, 3:08 pm

χαιρε Δαυιδ,

ἡ εντολη μου δικαια εστιν,

δικαιον το εμον προσταγμα,

εστιν δικαιοσυνη μονον εν τῃ μου εντολῃ.

δικαιως μεν ουν κελευω.

εντελλομαι μεν, δικαιῶ δε.

ερρωσο, ω φιλε μου.
0 x

timothy_p_mcmahon
Posts: 250
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 10:47 pm

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by timothy_p_mcmahon » August 6th, 2011, 7:00 pm

Sounds like an old Machen made-up sentence I recall from my long-ago youth.
0 x

Jason Hare
Posts: 619
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Contact:

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by Jason Hare » August 6th, 2011, 7:06 pm

Mark Lightman wrote:χαιρε Δαυιδ,

ἡ εντολη μου δικαια εστιν,

δικαιον το εμον προσταγμα,

εστιν δικαιοσυνη μονον εν τῃ μου εντολῃ.

δικαιως μεν ουν κελευω.

εντελλομαι μεν, δικαιῶ δε.

ερρωσο, ω φιλε μου.
Wouldn't it be nice to put the accents in for a beginner? Most people need them when they read Greek.
ἡ ἐντολή μου δίκαιά ἐστιν.

δίκαιον τὸ ἐμὸν πρόσταγμα.

ἔστιν δικαιοσύνη μόνον ἐν τῇ μου ἐντολῇ.

δικαίως μὲν οὖν κελεύω.

ἐτέλλομαι μέν, δικαιῶ δέ.
Here are accents on Marcus's words, for those who need them (as I always have).
0 x
Jason A. Hare
Tel Aviv, Israel

David Ting
Posts: 24
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:32 am

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by David Ting » August 6th, 2011, 8:31 pm

Dear all,

Thank you for your explanation. The actual text to be translated is actually "My commandment is righteous," not "My commandment in righteous." Sorry for the mistake.

The closest one that I can understand (I am a beginner learning Greek for a few weeks) is

ἡ εντολη μου δικαια εστιν

Why it is not ἡ εντολη μου εστιν δικαια? Is there any particular rule for the placement of the present indicative ἐστιν and the adjective δικαια? Parallel to English, I tend to think of "is righteous" as εστιν δικαια.

I read from the textbook that adjective used in the predicate position makes an assertion about the noun. The example given is ἀγαθος ὁ λογος, which means "The word is good." Parallel to this, is δικαια ἡ ἐντολη μου a valid translation also?

Jason, my lecturer ignore accent in his teaching.

Thank you for bearing with me.

David
0 x

Jason Hare
Posts: 619
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 5:28 pm
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Contact:

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by Jason Hare » August 6th, 2011, 8:41 pm

david.healed wrote:Dear all,

Thank you for your explanation. The actual text to be translated is actually "My commandment is righteous," not "My commandment in righteous." Sorry for the mistake.

The closest one that I can understand (I am a beginner learning Greek for a few weeks) is

ἡ εντολη μου δικαια εστιν

Why it is not ἡ εντολη μου εστιν δικαια? Is there any particular rule for the placement of the present indicative ἐστιν and the adjective δικαια? Parallel to English, I tend to think of "is righteous" as εστιν δικαια.

I read from the textbook that adjective used in the predicate position makes an assertion about the noun. The example given is ἀγαθος ὁ λογος, which means "The word is good." Parallel to this, is δικαια ἡ ἐντολη μου a valid translation also?

Jason, my lecturer ignore accent in his teaching.

Thank you for bearing with me.

David
Word order is more fluid in Greek. It's pretty standard, though, to place the predicate adjective before the verb εἰμί. That's how we learn it as we are introduced to Greek. Nothing particularly wrong with ἡ εντολη μου εστιν δικαια, but you'd probably look for a reason that this word order would be used. It just feels better to put it the other way. You'll get used to word order things as you read more Greek.

Don't forget that Greek isn't English. ;) Not everything needs to parallel.

Where are you studying Greek?
0 x
Jason A. Hare
Tel Aviv, Israel

David Lim
Posts: 901
Joined: June 6th, 2011, 6:55 am

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by David Lim » August 6th, 2011, 9:39 pm

david.healed wrote:ἡ εντολη μου δικαια εστιν

Why it is not ἡ εντολη μου εστιν δικαια? Is there any particular rule for the placement of the present indicative ἐστιν and the adjective δικαια? Parallel to English, I tend to think of "is righteous" as εστιν δικαια.

I read from the textbook that adjective used in the predicate position makes an assertion about the noun. The example given is ἀγαθος ὁ λογος, which means "The word is good." Parallel to this, is δικαια ἡ ἐντολη μου a valid translation also?
I read someone's explanation before that since word order within a single clause typically follows emphasis, "δικαια εστιν" would be more natural as the focus is about the commandment being righteous. (John 5:30 has a similar phrase "η κρισις η εμη δικαια εστιν" = "my judgement is righteous".) "δικαια ἡ ἐντολη μου" is also valid but with a slightly different emphasis: "righteous [is] my commandment". (John 5:32 has a similar phrase "αληθης εστιν η μαρτυρια ην μαρτυρει περι εμου" = "true is the testimony which I testify about myself".) But I think the predicate is not usually put before the subject unless it is an adjective (like here) or an anarthous noun (like "ανηρ αμαρτωλος ειμι" = "[a] sinful man I am" in Luke 5:8) or an adverbial clause (like "εν αυτω ζωη ην" = "in him life was" in John 1:4), or the it is clear what the subject is (like "εκεινος ουκ ειμι" = "that [one] I am not"). "ειμι" is usually not omitted because usually it contributes the subject but "εστιν" seems to be included or excluded according to the author's style.
0 x
δαυιδ λιμ

David Ting
Posts: 24
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:32 am

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by David Ting » August 7th, 2011, 11:00 am

Word order is more fluid in Greek. It's pretty standard, though, to place the predicate adjective before the verb εἰμί. That's how we learn it as we are introduced to Greek. Nothing particularly wrong with ἡ εντολη μου εστιν δικαια, but you'd probably look for a reason that this word order would be used. It just feels better to put it the other way. You'll get used to word order things as you read more Greek.

Don't forget that Greek isn't English. ;) Not everything needs to parallel.

Where are you studying Greek?
Thank you! I understand now.

I am studying a course of Master of Divinity at Malaysia Bible Seminary, Malaysia. I am 44 years old. Learning a new language is quite a challenge to me.
0 x

David Ting
Posts: 24
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 9:32 am

Re: How to translate "My commandment is righteous." to Greek

Post by David Ting » August 7th, 2011, 11:08 am

I read someone's explanation before that since word order within a single clause typically follows emphasis, "δικαια εστιν" would be more natural as the focus is about the commandment being righteous. (John 5:30 has a similar phrase "η κρισις η εμη δικαια εστιν" = "my judgement is righteous".) "δικαια ἡ ἐντολη μου" is also valid but with a slightly different emphasis: "righteous [is] my commandment". (John 5:32 has a similar phrase "αληθης εστιν η μαρτυρια ην μαρτυρει περι εμου" = "true is the testimony which I testify about myself".) But I think the predicate is not usually put before the subject unless it is an adjective (like here) or an anarthous noun (like "ανηρ αμαρτωλος ειμι" = "[a] sinful man I am" in Luke 5:8) or an adverbial clause (like "εν αυτω ζωη ην" = "in him life was" in John 1:4), or the it is clear what the subject is (like "εκεινος ουκ ειμι" = "that [one] I am not"). "ειμι" is usually not omitted because usually it contributes the subject but "εστιν" seems to be included or excluded according to the author's style.
Thank you for providing an explanation on the reason which such a word order is used.
0 x

Post Reply

Return to “Grammar Questions”