Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

In this forum, we will work with people who are training OCR engines for Polytonic Greek, helping them improve the quality of their engines by correcting specific texts.
Post Reply
BruceRobertson
Posts: 22
Joined: May 16th, 2014, 9:49 pm

Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

Post by BruceRobertson » May 17th, 2014, 2:45 pm

For our experiment in crowd-sourcing the generation of ground-truth for OCR improvement, here's an example I'll hand off to whoever would like to try it on.
The page image is:
Image
Text is the following between '############'s
The ground rules:
1. Never change the lines, either by inserting a line break or removing one. We are not training this aspect, and if wonky decisions are made by the software that does that aspect, it will not impact further OCR recognition. However, if you do play with this aspect, it will offset the training data and make a mess.
2. Correct EVERYTHING, and correct everything correctly. If you leave something incorrect, you are making things worse, basically reinforcing bad habits. Distinguish between superscript numbers and normal ones, for instance. Correct sigla.
3. Use composed unicode output (this is the most common default).
4. If a line should not be used in training, like line 4 below, replace its characters with 'xxxxx' Note that you should use this when the corresponding image does not contain real text. In that case, it was the underline that got recognized as letters. The same is true for the last line of the OCR output, which is noise on the page. We neither want to correct the output in this case or suggest that the output is 'blank', we just want to say this is not part of how we'll train you, Mister Computer.
5. In rare cases, due to a printer's error or ink-blot, the printed character does actually look like what it was recognized as, even though this is not what was originally on the printer's plates. In these cases, we should go with the (erroneous) recognized character, because it was a legit reading. (Even if you or I could tell that it is in fact alpha-smudge, not delta.)
6. Many of the remaining errors are combining vowels and accents, so be sure to check these carefully. Sometimes it helps to set the font size unusually large.
#############
1 10 A sHoRT GRAMMAR oF TIE GREEE NEW TEsTAMENT.
tive absolute, this construction is common in Homer. A number
of adverbs in the instrumental case illustrate this usage as πανοικεί
wweενw
(3 16:34), τάχα (Rom. 5:7), πανπληθεί (Luke 23:18), πάντῃ
ι(Aeiἴ7δ, κρυφῇ (Eph. 5:12), ιδᾳ (1 Cor. 12:11), δηροσ (λcts
16:37), ἅμα (Acts 24:26), and the preposition μετά and the con-
junction ἴνα.
(e) The instrumental case is also used to express the idea of
cause or ground. This conception likewise wavers between asso-
ciation and means. Thus we have τοιαύταις γὰρ θυσίαις εὐαρεστεῖται
(Heb. 13:16), τῇ ἀπιστᾳ ἐξεκλάσθησαν (Rom. 11:20), μὴ ξενζεσθε τῇ
ἐν ὑμῖν πυρώσει (1 Pet. 4:12), ῖνα μὴ τῷ σταυρῷ τοῦ Χριστοῦ διώκωνται.
(Gal. 6:12).
(f) Means or instrument can thus be naturally expressed by
this case. Donaldson (New Crαtylus, p. 439) calls it the imple-
mentive case. The verb χράομαι obviously, like utor in Latin, has
the instrumental case as πολλῇ παρρησίᾳ χρώμεθα (2 Cor. 3:12).
Other illustrations are συναπήχθη τῇ ὑποκρίσει (Gal. 2:13), ἤλιφεντῷ
μαργ (Luke 7:38), ἀνελεν δὲ Τάκωβον . ... ν2χαρῃ (Acts 12:2), δε-
δάμασται τῇ φύσει (ames 3:7), ἀλύσεσι δεδέσθαι (Mark 5:4), οὐ
φθαρτοῖς, ἀργυρίῳ ἢ χρυσίῳ, ἐλυτρώθητε, . . .. ἀλλὰ τιμίῳ αἴματι (I Pet.
1:18f.), πεπληρωμένους πάσῃ ἀδικίᾳ (Rom. 1: 2θ), χάριτί ἐστε σεσωσ-
μένοι (Eph. 2:8), τις ἦττηται (2 Peter 2:19); and probably also
τῇ γὰρ ἐλπίδι ἐσώθημεν (Rom. 8:24) and κατακαύσει πυρὶ ἀσβέστῳ
(Matt. 3:12) though these could also be locative. The agent with
passive verbs may also be expressed in the instrumental case as
οὐδὲν ξιον θανάτου ἐστὶν πεπραγμένοναὐτῷ (Luke23:15), and probably
κἀγω εὑρεθῶ ὑμῑν (2 Cor. 12:20), though this may possibly be a true
dative (Brugmann, Griechische Grammatik, S. 400).
(g) The instrumental case is used to express measure in com-
parative phrases. In English the is in the instrumental case in
phrases like the more, the less, as is shown by the Anglo-Saxon
thῇ (ιhὲ). The accusative gradually displaces the instrumental in
Greek for this idea, yet it appears several times in Hebrews as in
10:25, τοσούτῳ μᾶλλον ὅσῳ βλέπετε. See also πολλῷ μᾶλλον (Mark
''ʼ]ζζ'. ,1, wo oreoosi0οos ωse 1ρe 10αrυωνυοtο11o oree8, να
##############
0 x



Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3373
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

Post by Jonathan Robie » May 18th, 2014, 7:31 am

Do you want one person to do this, or several? I suspect we need some kind of protocol where we ask for volunteers, so that we don't have everyone try to do the same assignment, or everyone ignore it assuming someone else is doing it.
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

BruceRobertson
Posts: 22
Joined: May 16th, 2014, 9:49 pm

Re: Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

Post by BruceRobertson » May 18th, 2014, 2:18 pm

This is a one-person task, I think, since it should only take about 10 - 30 minutes, depending on keyboarding skills. Why don't we just have people claim them on the forum here, and then others will know they're tied up?
0 x

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3373
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

Post by Jonathan Robie » May 18th, 2014, 2:46 pm

OK, I'll claim this one then. Is this what you were looking for?

I suggest that a second pair of eyes proofread what I have done before you use this to train the OCR.

UPDATE: Nikolaos Adamou proofread this for me and found one remaining typo: ὑμῑν should be ὑμῖν. I have fixed this below.
110 A SHORT GRAMMAR OF THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT.
tive absolute, this construction is common in Homer. A number
of adverbs in the instrumental case illustrate this usage as πανοικεί
xxxxx
(Acts 16:34), τάχα (Rom. 5:7), πανπληθεί (Luke 23:18), πάντῃ
(Acts 24:3), κρυφῇ (Eph. 5:12), ἰδίᾳ (1 Cor. 12:11), δημοσίᾳ (Acts
16:37), ἅμα (Acts 24:26), and the preposition μετά and the con-
junction ἵνα.
(e) The instrumental case is also used to express the idea of
cause or ground. This conception likewise wavers between asso-
ciation and means. Thus we have τοιαύταις γὰρ θυσίαις εὐαρεστεῖται
(Heb. 13:16), τῇ ἀπιστίᾳ ἐξεκλάσθησαν (Rom. 11:20), μὴ ξενίζεσθε τῇ
ἐν ὑμῖν πυρώσει (1 Pet. 4:12), ἵνα μὴ τῷ σταυρῷ τοῦ Χριστοῦ διώκωνται.
(Gal. 6:12).
(f) Means or instrument can thus be naturally expressed by
this case. Donaldson (New Crαtylus, p. 439) calls it the imple-
mentive case. The verb χράομαι obviously, like utor in Latin, has
the instrumental case as πολλῇ παρρησίᾳ χρώμεθα (2 Cor. 3:12).
Other illustrations are συναπήχθη τῇ ὑποκρίσει (Gal. 2:13), ἤλειφεν τῷ
μύρῳ (Luke 7:38), ἀνεῖλεν δὲ Ἰάκωβον .... μαχαίρῃ (Acts 12:2), δε-
δάμασται τῇ φύσει (James 3:7), ἁλύσεσι δεδέσθαι (Mark 5:4), οὐ
φθαρτοῖς, ἀργυρίῳ ἢ χρυσίῳ, ἐλυτρώθητε, .... ἀλλὰ τιμίῳ αἵματι (I Pet.
1:18f.), πεπληρωμένους πάσῃ ἀδικίᾳ (Rom. 1: 29), χάριτί ἐστε σεσωσ-
μένοι (Eph. 2:8), ᾧ τις ἥττηται (2 Peter 2:19); and probably also
τῇ γὰρ ἐλπίδι ἐσώθημεν (Rom. 8:24) and κατακαύσει πυρὶ ἀσβέστῳ
(Matt. 3:12) though these could also be locative. The agent with
passive verbs may also be expressed in the instrumental case as
οὐδὲν ἄξιον θανάτου ἐστὶν πεπραγμένον αὐτῷ (Luke 23:15), and probably
κἀγὼ εὑρεθῶ ὑμῖν (2 Cor. 12:20), though this may possibly be a true
dative (Brugmann, Griechische Grammatik, S. 400).
(g) The instrumental case is used to express measure in com-
parative phrases. In English the is in the instrumental case in
phrases like the more, the less, as is shown by the Anglo-Saxon
thȳ (thē). The accusative gradually displaces the instrumental in
Greek for this idea, yet it appears several times in Hebrews as in
10:25, τοσούτῳ μᾶλλον ὅσῳ βλέπετε. See also πολλῷ μᾶλλον (Mark
10:48).
(h) Only two prepositions use the instrumental in Greek, ἅμα
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Jonathan Robie
Posts: 3373
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm
Location: Durham, NC
Contact:

Re: Assignment 1: Polytonic Greek OCR

Post by Jonathan Robie » May 18th, 2014, 2:48 pm

Incidentally, if you want to train these fonts, are they the same fonts as Robertson's larger grammar? Louis and Ted Hildebrandt have scanned and corrected the entire text for the larger grammar, preserving lines, so that might be useful for training this kind of text.
0 x
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
http://jonathanrobie.biblicalhumanities.org/

Post Reply