Page 1 of 1

Noun Form of the Verb ἔρχομαι

Posted: April 10th, 2018, 8:31 am
by Bernd Strauss
Mt 24:30: “Καὶ τότε φανήσεται τὸ σημεῖον τοῦ υἱοῦ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐν οὐρανῷ, καὶ τότε κόψονται πᾶσαι αἱ φυλαὶ τῆς γῆς καὶ ὄψονται τὸν υἱὸν τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐρχόμενον ἐπὶ τῶν νεφελῶν τοῦ οὐρανοῦ μετὰ δυνάμεως καὶ δόξης πολλῆς·”

The word ἐρχόμενον is a present participle of the verb ἔρχομαι. What is the noun form of the verb ἔρχομαι. Is it the same as the participle ἐρχόμενον?

Re: Noun Form of the Verb ἔρχομαι

Posted: April 10th, 2018, 5:47 pm
by Barry Hofstetter
No, there is no nominal form for this particular root. One would use nouns like πορεία or ὅδος.

Re: Noun Form of the Verb ἔρχομαι

Posted: April 10th, 2018, 6:41 pm
by timothy_p_mcmahon
ἔλευσις is related to the suppletive future tense that corresponds to ἔρχομαι, so maybe that would do.

Re: Noun Form of the Verb ἔρχομαι

Posted: April 11th, 2018, 5:49 am
by Bernd Strauss
Thank you. The word ἔλευσις is used at Ac 7:52, where Christ’s first coming is mentioned: “Τίνα τῶν προφητῶν οὐκ ἐδίωξαν οἱ πατέρες ὑμῶν; καὶ ἀπέκτειναν τοὺς προκαταγγείλαντας περὶ τῆς ἐλεύσεως τοῦ δικαίου, οὗ νῦν ὑμεῖς προδόται καὶ φονεῖς ἐγένεσθε.”

The second coming is often referred to by the word παρουσία, and it seems to be used with the same meaning as ἔλευσις in such instances. Patristic writers used the word παρουσία when speaking about both the first and the second coming.

Re: Noun Form of the Verb ἔρχομαι

Posted: April 11th, 2018, 7:30 am
by Barry Hofstetter
Bernd Strauss wrote:
April 11th, 2018, 5:49 am
Thank you. The word ἔλευσις is used at Ac 7:52, where Christ’s first coming is mentioned: “Τίνα τῶν προφητῶν οὐκ ἐδίωξαν οἱ πατέρες ὑμῶν; καὶ ἀπέκτειναν τοὺς προκαταγγείλαντας περὶ τῆς ἐλεύσεως τοῦ δικαίου, οὗ νῦν ὑμεῖς προδόται καὶ φονεῖς ἐγένεσθε.”

The second coming is often referred to by the word παρουσία, and it seems to be used with the same meaning as ἔλευσις in such instances. Patristic writers used the word παρουσία when speaking about both the first and the second coming.
Note that it's a hapax in the NT, and extremely rare in the rest of Greek literature.