"Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Forum rules
Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up. This is not a beginner's forum, competence in Greek is assumed.

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby MAubrey » May 19th, 2013, 10:16 pm

RandallButh wrote:Thank you, that is clearer and mostly agreeable. Howver, I wouldn't apply that statement "to just about any translated book."

I was referring specifically to translated books within the Greek Old Testament.
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 654
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby ed krentz » May 20th, 2013, 6:04 pm

Good Greek? The very concept is ambiguous. One must needs ask, what criterion do you use.

In fifth/fourth century Attic Greek you have to distinguish prose historians from the Greek used in tragedy and that in comedy. In Hellenistic Greek the Greek of Chrysippus and that of Epicurus differ from each other and from the Greek of poetry, e.g. Cleathes and hymnic texts. In Roman era Greek how can one define "good" Greek? Should it be based on literary texts? Such as Arius Didymus or Diogenes Laertius?

The concept of biblical Greek is equally problematic. What do you include in Bible? Etc.

One speak of grrammatically correct Greek, perhaps; or of rhetorcally influenced Greek.

Ed Krentz
Edgar Krentz
Prof. Emeritus of NT
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago
ed krentz
 
Posts: 55
Joined: February 22nd, 2012, 5:34 pm
Location: Chicago, IL

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby RandallButh » May 21st, 2013, 3:33 am

ed krentz wrote:Good Greek? The very concept is ambiguous. One must needs ask, what criterion do you use.

In fifth/fourth century Attic Greek you have to distinguish prose historians from the Greek used in tragedy and that in comedy. In Hellenistic Greek the Greek of Chrysippus and that of Epicurus differ from each other and from the Greek of poetry, e.g. Cleathes and hymnic texts. In Roman era Greek how can one define "good" Greek? Should it be based on literary texts? Such as Arius Didymus or Diogenes Laertius?

The concept of biblical Greek is equally problematic. What do you include in Bible? Etc.

One speak of grrammatically correct Greek, perhaps; or of rhetorcally influenced Greek.

Ed Krentz


Yes, one needs a criterion. With the LXX, several interpreted the criterion as 'natural', mother-tongue sounding, vs. translationese sounding.
RandallButh
 
Posts: 611
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby Jonathan Robie » May 22nd, 2013, 8:18 am

Here's one criterion: can I read the book without thinking about the fact that it was originally written in another language? In Ecclesiastes, for instance, some phrases seem to have unusual grammar that matches the way someone would say the same thing in Hebrew.

Of course, the same might be said of the New American Standard Bible. So here's another criterion: which books of the Septuagint are less translationese than the New American Standard?
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1546
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby Ken M. Penner » May 22nd, 2013, 9:25 pm

Jonathan Robie wrote:In Ecclesiastes, for instance, some phrases seem to have unusual grammar that matches the way someone would say the same thing in Hebrew.

Ecclesiastes is the worst of the books I edited for the Lexham English Septuagint. Note especially some uses of συν. See the comments of Peter Gentry on the translation profile, at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/nets/edition/ ... s-nets.pdf
Ken M. Penner
St. Francis Xavier University
Ken M. Penner
 
Posts: 624
Joined: May 12th, 2011, 7:50 am
Location: Antigonish, NS, Canada

Re: "Good Greek" in the Septuagint

Postby Jonathan Robie » May 22nd, 2013, 10:05 pm

Ken M. Penner wrote:
Jonathan Robie wrote:In Ecclesiastes, for instance, some phrases seem to have unusual grammar that matches the way someone would say the same thing in Hebrew.

Ecclesiastes is the worst of the books I edited for the Lexham English Septuagint. Note especially some uses of συν. See the comments of Peter Gentry on the translation profile, at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/nets/edition/ ... s-nets.pdf


Ah, so reading the NETS translation profiles is a good way to get a feel for what to expect for a given book?

And yes, that's precisely how I felt while reading Ecclesiastes ...
ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες καὶ διηποροῦντο, ἄλλος πρὸς ἄλλον λέγοντες, τί θέλει τοῦτο εἶναι;
Jonathan Robie
 
Posts: 1546
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:34 pm

Previous

Return to Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest