Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Forum rules
Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up. This is not a beginner's forum, competence in Greek is assumed.
Post Reply
Mike Baber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 30th, 2011, 11:25 pm
Location: Texas

Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Mike Baber » June 20th, 2011, 10:03 am

Image

On the footnote 2, it refers to a source "St. Anastas. Hexaem. Lib. VII."

I'm assuming this is a St. Anastasia, but I don't know what the source is (Hexaem?). Can anyone help me?
0 x



Stephen Carlson
Posts: 2835
Joined: May 11th, 2011, 10:51 am
Location: Melbourne
Contact:

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Stephen Carlson » June 20th, 2011, 10:43 am

Mike Baber wrote:On the footnote 2, it refers to a source "St. Anastas. Hexaem. Lib. VII."

I'm assuming this is a St. Anastasia, but I don't know what the source is (Hexaem?). Can anyone help me?
Actually, it's St. Anastasius of Sinai of the 7th and 8th centuries. The work is called Hexaemeron, referring to the six days of creation.

Stephen
0 x
Stephen C. Carlson, Ph.D.
Melbourne, Australia

Ken M. Penner
Posts: 785
Joined: May 12th, 2011, 7:50 am
Location: Antigonish, NS, Canada
Contact:

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Ken M. Penner » June 20th, 2011, 11:00 am

Mike Baber wrote:Image

On the footnote 2, it refers to a source "St. Anastas. Hexaem. Lib. VII."

I'm assuming this is a St. Anastasia, but I don't know what the source is (Hexaem?). Can anyone help me?
It's in Migne's PG 89.

See http://www.documentacatholicaomnia.eu/1 ... ,_MGR.html
0 x
Ken M. Penner
St. Francis Xavier University

Mike Baber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 30th, 2011, 11:25 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Mike Baber » June 20th, 2011, 11:22 am

Anastasius Sinaita...sounds like an interesting man.

Well, I can't find an English translation. Seems like there are a few projects in the process of translating his Hexaemeron. Edit: I'm going to try to translate that Greek and then post it here for critique.
0 x

Mike Baber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 30th, 2011, 11:25 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Mike Baber » June 20th, 2011, 12:35 pm

lol...don't laugh at my translation.

For what reason the others who interpret those things about the wonderful Symmachos they surrendered/ gave out/ gave up the saying/ voice/ discourse. For, instead of the saying, "I have acquired a man by the Lord," he says, "I have acquired a man with the Lord," that is, "man being a ruler with the Lord," God being of both him and a man. But, the other, "I have acquired a man, the Lord," he wrote so that it was said, "A man, the Lord," accordingly, Thomas also said to him, "My Lord and my God."

I know it's quite bad, so any help would be appreciated. I had to guess at many things.
0 x

cwconrad
Posts: 2110
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714
Contact:

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by cwconrad » June 20th, 2011, 12:44 pm

Mike Baber wrote:lol...don't laugh at my translation.

For what reason the others who interpret those things about the wonderful Symmachos they surrendered/ gave out/ gave up the saying/ voice/ discourse. For, instead of the saying, "I have acquired a man by the Lord," he says, "I have acquired a man with the Lord," that is, "man being a ruler with the Lord," God being of both him and a man. But, the other, "I have acquired a man, the Lord," he wrote so that it was said, "A man, the Lord," accordingly, Thomas also said to him, "My Lord and my God."

I know it's quite bad, so any help would be appreciated. I had to guess at many things.
Here, for what it's worth, is what I make of it:

"Consequently different interpreters in the circle of Symmachus have edited an expression of this sort in an astonishing fashion. Instead of saying, “ἐκτησάμην ἄνθρωπον διὰ τοῦ κυρίου”, one (of them) says (lit. ‘has said’), “ἐκτησάμην ἄνθρωπον σὺν κυρίῳ, i.e., a human being united to the Lord, one who is at the same time a god and a human being, while the other of the two interpreters in turn writes (‘has written’), “ἐκτησάμην ἄνθρωπον κύριον”, so that you might say a man-god, just as Thomas said to him, “ὁ κύριος … " (cf. John 20:28 ἀπεκρίθη Θωμᾶς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτῷ· ὁ κύριός μου καὶ ὁ θεός μου.)
0 x
οὔτοι ἀπ’ ἀρχῆς πάντα θεοὶ θνητοῖς ὑπέδειξαν,
ἀλλὰ χρόνῳ ζητέοντες ἐφευρίσκουσιν ἄμεινον. (Xenophanes, Fragment 16)

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)

Mike Baber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 30th, 2011, 11:25 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Mike Baber » June 20th, 2011, 1:32 pm

What is ἡγωμένον? Is it a present middle participle of ἡγέομαι? I looked up ἡγέομαι in LSJ (via Perseus), but I didn't find it used in the sense of "unite." Can you elaborate Carl?
0 x

Ken M. Penner
Posts: 785
Joined: May 12th, 2011, 7:50 am
Location: Antigonish, NS, Canada
Contact:

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Ken M. Penner » June 20th, 2011, 1:40 pm

Mike Baber wrote:What is ἡγωμένον? Is it a present middle participle of ἡγέομαι? I looked up ἡγέομαι in LSJ (via Perseus), but I didn't find it used in the sense of "unite." Can you elaborate Carl?
From ἑνόω.
0 x
Ken M. Penner
St. Francis Xavier University

cwconrad
Posts: 2110
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714
Contact:

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by cwconrad » June 20th, 2011, 2:04 pm

It's not ἡγωγμένην with a gamma, but rather ἡνωμένην with a nu; as Ken rightly notes, it is from ἑνόω, "unify" or "make one."
0 x
οὔτοι ἀπ’ ἀρχῆς πάντα θεοὶ θνητοῖς ὑπέδειξαν,
ἀλλὰ χρόνῳ ζητέοντες ἐφευρίσκουσιν ἄμεινον. (Xenophanes, Fragment 16)

Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)

Mike Baber
Posts: 97
Joined: May 30th, 2011, 11:25 pm
Location: Texas

Re: Field's Notes on Hexapla for Genesis 4:1

Post by Mike Baber » June 20th, 2011, 2:17 pm

Aw :D Makes a LOT more sense. :lol:
0 x

Post Reply

Return to “Septuagint and Pseudepigrapha”