Variant Reading in Josephus

Other Greek writings of the New Testament era, including papyri and inscriptions
Forum rules
Please quote the Greek text you are discussing directly in your post if it is reasonably short - do not ask people to look it up. This is not a beginner's forum, competence in Greek is assumed.

Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby MAubrey » March 22nd, 2012, 9:24 pm

I came across this variant morphological form in Βίος:

§385 Ἐγὼ δ ̓ ἀκούσας ἠπόρουν, τίνα τρόπον ἐξαρπάσω τὴν
Τιβεριάδα τῆς Γαλιλαίων ὀργῆς. ἀρνήσασθαι γὰρ οὐκ ἐδυνάμην
μὴ γεγραφέναι τοὺς Τιβεριεῖς καλοῦντας τὸν βασιλέα· ἤλεγχον γὰρ
αἱ παρ ̓ ἐκείνου πρὸς αὐτοὺς ἀντιγραφαὶ τὴν ἀλήθειαν.

Niese's apparatus reads:
γεγραφηκέναι MW

I never expected to see this form for γράφω's perfect infinitive. Perseus won't parse it and I only see four other instances in the Duke Databank Papyri. Am I just seeing a desire by the scribe (and the four papyri authors) to regularize this perfect infinitive to the -κα paradigm? When I see -κε- I normally think pluperfect, but that can't be the case with the infinitive.

Anyway, more than anything else, I'm just curious to hear what other think of this particular morphological creation.

Thoughts?
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 625
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby Louis L Sorenson » March 22nd, 2012, 9:42 pm

I find at least 15 occurances of γεγραφηκέναι versus 213 of γεγραφέναι.
Louis L Sorenson
 
Posts: 582
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA

Re: Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby MAubrey » March 22nd, 2012, 10:43 pm

Are you searching TLG? Or something else?

My search for the form was in Logos' edition of Perseus.
Mike Aubrey
Canada Institute of Linguistics & Trinity Western University Graduate School
MAubrey
 
Posts: 625
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 8:52 pm
Location: British Columbia

Re: Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby Louis L Sorenson » March 22nd, 2012, 11:32 pm

Yes, TLG.
Louis L Sorenson
 
Posts: 582
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA

Re: Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby Ken M. Penner » March 23rd, 2012, 2:20 am

MAubrey wrote:γεγραφηκέναι MW
... Am I just seeing a desire by the scribe (and the four papyri authors) to regularize this perfect infinitive to the -κα paradigm?

That would be my guess as well. Βιος has a couple more instances of γεγραφέναι (in 358-359), with no variants noted.
BDAG does list a -κα- form (γεγραφήκαμεν in 2 Macc 1:7). LSJ says "later γεγράφηκα; IG11(4).1026 (Delos, ii B.C.); PHib.1.78.2 (iii B.C.)."
Ken M. Penner
St. Francis Xavier University
Ken M. Penner
 
Posts: 616
Joined: May 12th, 2011, 7:50 am
Location: Antigonish, NS, Canada

Re: Variant Reading in Josephus

Postby cwconrad » March 23rd, 2012, 6:09 am

Perhaps this has already been answered to the satisfaction of Mike. I don't really understand what the problem is. The verb γράφειν has a 1st perfect γέγραφα and a 2nd perfect γεγράφηκα, just as it has a 1st passive ἐγράφθην and a 2nd passive ἐγράφην. The perfect infinitive ending is -έναι. I would expect that one might find both forms in this era when some are beginning to Atticize -- and Josephus falls into that category, doesn't he? That being the case, he would choose the older perfect stem.

It's always seemed a bit amusing to me that the older aorists, perfect, and passives are called "second" and the newer forms are called "first." I realize that "first" here must mean "more common" -- but it still seems to me that the earlier form ought to be called "first" and the later one "second." I remember having to do a second take with Aristotle's distinction of two senses of πρῶτος: "first" in the natural order, and "first" in relation to ourselves.
Carl W. Conrad
Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)
… ἐπειδὴ καὶ τὸν οἶνον ἠξίους
πίνειν, συνεκποτέ’ ἐστί σοι καὶ τὴν τρύγα Aristophanes, Plutus 1085
cwconrad
 
Posts: 1252
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 5:52 pm
Location: Burnsville, NC 28714


Return to Koine Greek Texts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests