TCL: Teaching Classical Languages Jounal

Textbooks, Graded Readers, Beginner Resources and links, Teaching aids, etc.
Post Reply
Louis L Sorenson
Posts: 705
Joined: May 5th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Location: Burnsville, MN, USA
Contact:

TCL: Teaching Classical Languages Jounal

Post by Louis L Sorenson » November 17th, 2012, 7:24 pm

For those who are interested in pedagogy in the classical Greek and Latin theater, you can look at the following publication.
http://camws.org/tcl/
TCL: Teaching Classical Languages
Ancient Languages.
Contemporary Pedagogy.

Welcome to Teaching Classical Languages (TCL). TCL is the peer-reviewed, online journal dedicated to exploring how we teach (and how we learn) Greek and Latin. TCL is sponsored by the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS).

Eeli Kaikkonen
Posts: 383
Joined: June 2nd, 2011, 7:49 am
Location: Finland
Contact:

Re: TLC: Teaching Classical Languages Journal

Post by Eeli Kaikkonen » November 18th, 2012, 4:50 am

Louis L Sorenson wrote:For those who are interested in pedagogy in the classical Greek and Latin theater, you can look at the following publication.
http://camws.org/tcl/
TCL: Teaching Classical Languages
Ancient Languages.
Contemporary Pedagogy.

Welcome to Teaching Classical Languages (TCL). TCL is the peer-reviewed, online journal dedicated to exploring how we teach (and how we learn) Greek and Latin. TCL is sponsored by the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS).
Thank you very much! It appears to be useful even for those who don't teach others. For example, by quick browsing I found two interesting articles.

(http://www.camws.org/cpl/cplonline/volu ... er2008.htm) Wilfred E. Major: It's Not the Size, It's the Frequency: The Value of Using a Core Vocabulary in Beginning and Intermediate Greek. BTW, It happens to refer to the article by Anne Mahoney mentioned in another thread at the same time.

(http://www.camws.org/cpl/cplonline/volu ... ll2006.htm) DEXTER HOYOS: Translating: Facts, Illusions, Alternatives. It's about teaching Latin, but shows that teachers and students of Koine are not alone with their problems.
Hoyos wrote:The second drawback is still more damaging. Translating-to-understand encourages learners to assume—and encourages them, to the point of making it a fixed reflex—that the proper medium for understanding and absorbing Roman literature is English. Mature and responsible minds may slowly grow out of this, but when it is the implicit message from the beginning, and then is reinforced at every further level, it is a reflex that most find themselves indoctrinated in forever. This is killing to any in-depth comprehension of a text. Words and, still more important, word-groups are scanned to work out how they can be restated in English (or whatever the translator’s language is), rather than for their interrelationships, implications and allusions. For seeing Latin texts sub specie Anglicitatis automatically means rearranging words and word-groups—mentally at least, often explicitly—to conform to English usages.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests