Archive for January 5th, 2005

Patrick Herron wrote to tell me and others that he just taped a poem for WCHL AM to be played on air tomorrow (Thursday January 5) between 7 and 9AM to “WCHL Morning News with Ron Stutts.” I can say without giving anything away that the poem is about Patrick’s friend, Marine Jonathan Kuniholm.
Listen in! Unfortunately WCHL doesn’t webcast but they do archive so the poem may be available later.

Comments No Comments »

eVoting EFF logo
The Electronic Frontier Foundation has started an eVoting petition that asks that good safe reliable and open procedures for eVoting be followed.

Dear Election Official:

I believe that election integrity is the foundation of democracy, and that the transparent investigation of election problems is imperative.

I believe that the public has the right to an honest discourse on the performance of its voting technologies, and that knowledge of their performance is a prerequisite for that conversation.

I believe that truly independent security professionals and academic researchers should be not only allowed to examine election technologies, but required to publish their findings.

For these reasons, I urge you to allow independent, non-ITA testing of the voting machines used in your county during the 2004 presidential election.

  1. Visit the EFF eVote site.
  2. Read the good stuff there.
  3. Sign the petition.

Comments No Comments »

What me worry?

Alfred E. Newman
Frank Kelly Freas who was famous for his many sci-fi illustrations, LP covers, and for his work at Mad magazine, died in his sleep at age 82 on January 2nd 2005. Freas won 11 Hugo Awards for his illustrations, but will remain most famous to me for his Alfred E. Newman images in Mad from the early 60s. Note that there is no resemblance between Newman and Larry Lessig pictured below.

Smiling Spirit
Will Eisner, whose Spirit inspired and even nurtured many comic/graphic artists, died at his home in Florida last night. Eisner invented the terms graphic novel (having done the first serious one) and sequential art as well as exemplifying the kind of serious storytelling that could be done in the comic/comix genre. Just to cite one example of Eisner’s influence, Michael Chabon says that:

I think Eisner was unique in feeling from the start that comic books were not necessarily this despised, bastard, crappy, low-brow kind of art form, and that there was a potential for real art. And he saw that from the very beginning, which was very unusual, and I took that quality and gave it to Joe Kavalier.

Comments No Comments »