Archive for December 1st, 2006

Eben Moglen and friends at the Software Freedom Law Center (see us in India here) gives a much needed smack to Blackboard, the education support system would-be-monopolist.


Cory Doctorow
writes in Forbes Special Future of the Book about “Giving It All Away” explaining “I’ve been giving away my books ever since my first novel came out, and boy has it ever made me a bunch of money.”

Both Eben and Cory have been ibiblio-sponsored speakers here at UNC.

Comments No Comments »

Our new J-School Dean, Jean Folkerts, is featured on WCHL 1360 in a story that announces a new blogging position in the School (I am on the faculty of the UNC J-School):

Academics at the UNC Journalism School will take a leap into the digital age with the addition of a teaching position centered on blogging and online news.

The school’s dean Jean Folkerts says the job listing signals how the mass media have changed in the past decade.

The creation of the online news position is among the first significant moves Folkerts has made as the journalism school’s new dean.

She says she wants the school’s graduates to be able to cross over platforms of old and new media, but she’s not straying from the school’s core principles.

Folkerts says creative production will be part of the professor’s duties, which could mean maintaining a blog or generating multimedia presentations.


The job description for our ” Outstanding Scholar in News/Online Journalism” is here

Comments No Comments »

And not the NeoPet or Harvey or Bonzi Buddy type virtual friends, but friends you find online and then perhaps later in physical space.

BBC reports on the University of Southern California Center for the Digital Future‘s 2007 Digital Future report:

Virtual pals ‘soar in importance’

Online community members value their virtual friends

Virtual communities are as important as their real-world counterparts, many members of online communities believe.

A survey found 43% of online networkers from the US felt “as strongly” about their web community as they did about their real-world friends.

It also revealed net-users had made an average of 4.6 virtual pals this year.

The survey, from the US-based Center for the Digital Future, of 2,000 individuals forms part of a six-year study into attitudes to the web.

Each year, the University of Southern California researchers publish data tracking the changing opinions of the same American households to the internet.

On the results of their sixth report, Jeffrey Cole, director of the centre, said: “More than a decade after the portals of the worldwide web opened to the public, we are now witnessing the true emergence of the internet as the powerful personal and social phenomenon we knew it would become.”

[... see article for more]


Read the full Center for the Digital Future 2007 Report here.

Comments No Comments »