Archive for December 11th, 2006

Dan Gillmor - Chapel Hill 2006
Dan Gillmor‘s talk “We the (Traditional) Media: From Lecture to Conversation” given here on November 13 is now live at the ibiblio speaker site and for download as a torrent from the ibiblio torrent site.

Comments No Comments »

ae alerts us to an exhibit and a series of events called “I Raised my Hand to Volunteer: Students Protest in 1960s Chapel Hill” beginning on January 23 with all but the ultimate event in Wilson Library — that last event will be at the Sonja Hayes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, Seminar Room.

Scheduled events include:

  • Jan. 23, 2007- Prof. Peter Filene, Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor in the History Department at UNC-Chapel Hill, will give a talk entitled “Personally Authentic: Carolina Student Protestors in the Sixties.” Filene, who began teaching at UNC in 1967 and has won six teaching awards in his career, will draw on his own experiences, as well as his research and teaching about the political movements of the era and student activism in general. Wilson Library, reception and exhibit viewing at 5:15 p.m., program at 6 p.m.
  • Jan. 30, 2007 – “Pressing the Hold-outs: The Desegregation Sit-ins of 1963-1964,” moderated by Sally Greene, Chapel Hill Town Councilwoman and adjunct professor of law at UNC. Wilson Library, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
  • Feb. 6, 2007 – “Speaking Out-of-Bounds: Communism, Race, Intellectual Freedom, and the Speaker Ban Controversy of the Mid-Sixties,” moderated by Ferrel Guillory, Director, Program on Public Life. The panel will include William Friday, who was president of the UNC system at the time of the controversy, and Lewis Lipsitz, an outspoken opponent of the ban. Wilson Library, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
  • Feb. 13, 2007 – “Stomping Down: The Foodworkers Strike of 1969 and the Black Student Movement,” moderated by Dr. Archie Ervin, Associate Provost for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at UNC. Sonja Hayes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, Seminar Room, 5:30 – 7 p.m.

Comments No Comments »