The Real Paul Jones

Accept no substitutes

Cory Doctorow at UNC – Feb 22 at 2

Paul, · Categories: General

Posters for Cory’s visit are available here.

2/22 at 2pm Cory Doctorow will be here visiting at Duke and dropping by UNC:

Who: Cory Doctorow

Quick on Cory: Boingboing editor, EFF, SciFi Writer, Disney-obsessed Copyfighter, Fulbright Chair at Annenberg UCSD

When: 2 pm Thursday February 22nd (aka 2/22 at 2)

Where: Freedom Forum Conference Center
3rd Floor, Carroll Hall

NOW in Wilson Library


UNC-Chapel Hill

Cory’s previous trip to UNC on Video

Sponsors: ibiblio.org, UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Free Culture Carolina, School of Information and Library Science

More about Cory:

Cory Doctorow (craphound.com) is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net), and a contributor to Wired, Popular Science, Make, the New York Times, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org), a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. In that capacity, he worked to balance international treaties, polices and standards on copyright and related rights, advocating in the halls of governments, the United Nations, standards bodies, corporations, universities and non-profit. Presently, he serves as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California. His novels are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their re-use and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. He has won the Locus and Sunburst Awards, and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula and British Science Fiction Awards. He co-founded the open source peer-to-peer software company OpenCola, sold to OpenText, Inc in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the MetaBrainz Foundation, Technorati, Inc, Stikkit, Annenberg Center for the Study of Online Communities, SiteShuffle, and Onion Networks, Inc. His latest novel is Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town.

Cory will also be speaking at Duke that evening at 5 pm as part of the Provost Lecture Series.

Another nice version of the UNC announcement of Cory’s visit from the School of Information and Library Science.

Cory Doctorow

Allen and Son in LA Times

Paul, · Categories: General

North Carolina’s best BBQ makes the LA Times. We await the streams of Hollywood visitors coming to taste the Nanner Puddin’.

Barbecue done in rare form. 

Selected snippet:

Allen tastes every batch of barbecue that comes off his chopping block. He seeks that biting, smoky flavor he says only a properly maintained hickory fire can impart over many hours of cooking.

“I think about barbecue like some people think about wine,” he said. “The good stuff? You know it when you taste it.”

ibiblio 404 page gets much love

Paul, · Categories: General

Our wonderful custom 404 page gets love before Valentine’s from

Reddit readers and commenters:

The worlds most comprehensive “404 FILE NOT FOUND” message.

and it’s popular on del.icio.us:

  1. The Most Comprehensive “404” Page Award Goes To…

    first posted by savaged on 2007-01-30 … saved by 45 people ( 14 recently )

Nature stories

Paul, · Categories: General

Academic talk title of the week — Are you a man or a mollusk?:

We are pleased to announce a talk sponsored by the Department of English: William Stott will give a talk titled “Of Bivalves and Men: The Eastern Oyster as Fact and Symbol,” tomorrow (Wed., Jan. 31) at 1:00 pm in Donovan Lounge in Greenlaw Hall. Dr. Stott will discuss his research on the Carolina coast.

Pictures on the radio — Chapel Hill News’ Mark Schultz reports that WCHL’s Ron Stutts reports that Ron’s wife reports that she saw and photographed a white deer in their backyard.

The NandO blog, Orange Chat, features a picture of a white deer — not the picture that Ron reported tho.

Tonight: “Pressing the Hold-outs: The Desegregation Demonstrations of 1963-64″

Paul, · Categories: General

Pickets in Chapel Hill 1963

Sally will be leading a panel at the Wilson Library on Tonight January 30: Discussion, 5:30-7 pm, Pleasants Family Assembly Room, Wilson Library “Pressing the Hold-outs: The Desegregation Demonstrations of 1963-64″

On the panel will be:
Quinton Baker: Leader in the 1963-64 sit-ins; one of the protagonists of John Ehle’s book “The Free Men”
Karen Parker: Activist in the 1963-64 sit-ins; first black female to earn her undergraduate degree from UNC-Chapel Hill
Braxton Foushee: Activist in the sit-ins; graduate of Lincoln High School; later became a member of the Carrboro Board of Aldermen and the School Board
Erika Stallings: Current UNC-Chapel Hill student; active in Campus Y, Black Student Movement, and Student Government

Discussion at OrangePolitics (where Sally in a comment tells us of a previously unannounced guest of great importance)

Our farflung ibiblians

Paul, · Categories: General

Mark McCarthy, now of the UN’s ReliefWeb and Jim Fullton, now of the World Intellectual Property Organization, just called from an Irish pub in Geneva, Switzerland. The Irish part appropriate for a McCarthy; the pub part predictable for a Fullton ;->

If the alphabet were geography, Dykki Settle, now with INTRAHealth, would be nearby (to Mark and Jim). He writes from Swaziland that he misses being there in Switzerland.

In the meantime, Beth “Icky” Lyons writes that she’s heading as far from Geneva as possible — to see summer in New Zealand whilst working on a Habitat home in Tauranga. You might be able to follow her adventures on her blog, Red Wagon.

Bora-mania — the interview

Paul, · Categories: General

Science Blogging Conference co-conspirator Bora Zivkovic is interviewed at BrainShrub (on Odeo so’s you need Flash).

Philip Lopez paintings at Tyndall Galleries

Paul, · Categories: General

Philip Lopez is known to his friends as Tom. He’s an artist whose work is at once a reduction of three dimensions into two and a master of working textures in to his paintings by layers of overpainting and removal by a variety of means. Think of that you see out of the corner of your eye as you drive by a building then flattened and abstracted
We bought Little Crook which I learned was inspired by Tom aka Philip’s chicken house. That seems appropriate since I’ve started some of my better poems recently in a small building in a chickenyard out on Peter Kramer and Susan Gladen’s farm.

Michele Natale describes Philip aka Tom’s show this way:

Substantial abstract and semi-abstract paintings on wood panels display richly colored, highly worked surfaces, layered, squeegeed or abraded by sanding, then divided into compositional compartments by roughly gouged lines. Painted areas are sometimes contrasted with areas cut from metal plates, nailed into the panel. Ovoid forms reminiscent of eggs or pods, and even a vaguely floral motif find their way into the geometry of this intriguing body of work.

Watch this Space

Paul, · Categories: General

Today was our space day.

It began with a trip to Raleigh to the Museum of Natural Sciences for Astronomy Day where Tucker and I took in the very cool Elumenati Dome, stumped the “Stump the Scientist” with a question about the size of the Radiosphere, asked “If the Sun were to be suddenly removed, how long would it be before the lack of solar gravity would be noticed on earth?” (and got no real answer — my own guess about 8 and 1/3 minutes, the time it takes for light from the sun to reach earth) and generally enjoyed visiting the exhibits.

We took a break for Odyssey of the Mind and a Neighborhood meeting, then watched 2001: A Space Odyssey. Tucker having read the book (more than once I might mention) had much more insight to the story than I had. And since he’d also read 2010, he had some other ideas about parts that were completely opaque to me.

Just had mail from Bora alerting us to the appearance of the Science Blogging Anthology at Daily Koz where a Science thread featuring some interesting objects in space are also noted. 

Death by Hot Tea

Paul, · Categories: General

I just brewed up a cuppa and was sitting down to read papers when I read this post on Boingboing:

Murdered spy Litvinenko was killed with radioactive teapot

Now that’s what I call a cuppa HOT tea.

Fred-mania at EduCause

Paul, · Categories: General

Fred Stutzman’s research and his blog are cited twice in the 2007 Horizon Report from EduCause.

How university administrators should approach the Facebook: Ten rules
(Fred Stutzman, Unit Structures, January 23, 2006)
This blog entry describes current trends around Facebook and recommends measures for university administrators.

And

social Networking: five sites You Need to Know
(Fred Stutzman, Unit Structures, June 14, 2006)
This blog entry gives an overview of five lesser known social networking sites and describes three emerging trends related to the use of such sites.

Desegregating Chapel Hill

Paul, · Categories: General

Sally will be leading a panel at the Wilson Library on Tuesday January 30: Discussion, 5:30-7 pm, Pleasants Family Assembly Room, Wilson Library “Pressing the Hold-outs: The Desegregation Demonstrations of 1963-64″

On the panel will be:

Quinton Baker: Leader in the 1963-64 sit-ins; one of the protagonists of John Ehle’s book “The Free Men”
Karen Parker: Activist in the 1963-64 sit-ins; first black female to earn her undergraduate degree from UNC-Chapel Hill
Braxton Foushee: Activist in the sit-ins; graduate of Lincoln High School; later became a member of the Carrboro Board of Aldermen and the School Board
Erika Stallings: Current UNC-Chapel Hill student; active in Campus Y, Black Student Movement, and Student Government

Discussion at OrangePolitics (where Sally in a comment tells us of a previously unannounced guest of great importance)

20th Century Fox: Blame Canada

Paul, · Categories: General

Can it be true?

Are 50% of the world’s pirated movies coming (not movies featuring pirates) from Canada?

A nation of only 33 million people obviously very busy, camcorder obcesssed people (nearly 18% of whom are under 14 years old)?

Canada.com reports that being bilingual is one thing that makes Canada a pirate hot spot (even though “pirate” and “hot spot” are not terms I’d associate with Canada).

As much as 50 per cent of the world’s pirated movies come from Canada, prompting the film industry to threaten to delay the release of new titles in this country.

According to an investigation by Twentieth Century Fox, most of the illegal recording, or “camcording,” is taking place in Montreal movie houses, taking advantage of bilingual releases and lax copyright laws.

[...]

LinuxWorldExpo site runs on Windoz!

Paul, · Categories: General

Tarus on the Trilug list exposes Linux World Expo‘s inconsistency. And NetCraft supports the Trilug claim.

Carrboro Commons 2

Paul, · Categories: General

Jock Lauterer alerts us tha the second issue of the UNC J-School produced “Carrboro Commons” is just out. Read about the Weave, the Dog Park, WCOM, and more.

Hip-hop at the Crossroads — and in Endeavors

Paul, · Categories: General

Endeavors magazine has a nice article, “Hip-hip at the Crossroads,” on Ali Neff’s “Let The World Listen Right.” Ali’s film is part of the Folkstreams Project here at ibiblio.org.

Science Blogging Conference Wrap-UP

Paul, · Categories: General

science bloggers conference logo

From Anton (for Bora, Brian and me):

Hello again. We wanted to contact you one more time to extend our heartfelt thanks to you for attending the 2007 North Carolina Science Blogging Conference. Bora, Brian, Paul and I were delighted to meet you and greet you last weekend, and we truly appreciate your participation in the event.

Here are a some wrap-up announcements:

1. Please take a few minutes to share your comments about this conference and suggestions for how we might improve the next science blogging event. Use this easy to fill-in form.

2. The wiki has a comprehensive listing of links about the conference. You can find audio files for Dr. Willard’s talk and slides for Dr. Stemwedel’s talk, as well as links to all of your postings before, during and after the event. If we’re missing your posts, send Bora a message.

3. Help us thank our sponsors, donors, contributors and discussion leaders by visiting their blogs and websites. Click on the logos at the bottom of the wiki home page, or find a comprehensive listing of people to thank here. If you or your organization would like to get on the list of sponsors for the next science blogging conference, or help organize the event, send Anton a message or add a comment at the end of the feedback form.

4. Public Library of Science graciously donated t-shirts. In return, they ask that anyone who took a shirt sign up for the free PLoS One service and try it out for a while.

5. The science blogging anthology is out. Get it.

6. Lastly, if you live in or visit the Triangle region (Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill), please join us at another of our BlogTogether events, including the Chapel Hill Bloggers Meetup and the Raleigh Bloggers Meetup. Monitor our blog at and sign up for our mailing list to learn about our events and social gatherings.

That’s all. Again, thank you. Keep in touch, and keep on blogging.

Anton, Bora, Brian and Paul

Y b tiny?

Paul, · Categories: General

Tiny Icon Factory from MIT. tiny guitar

Y b brf?

Paul, · Categories: General

Tim O’Reilly explains about brevity.

Science Blogging – Audio of Hunt Willard

Paul, · Categories: General

Brian‘s digital recorder caught (with permission) Dr. Hunt Willard‘s session on Promoting public understanding of science at the Science Blogging Conference this past weekend.

Here’s the talk and the questions and answers following.