Beautiful Thoughts
Louis St Lewis is a self-confessed trouble-maker of the delightfully artistic sort. Each Louis art opening is a little event of its own, but today’s opening at Tyndall Galleries was more special than most. For one thing, there was more of Louis’ work and the work is quite different from his collages and his early bone assemblies. But Louis, who was dressed in a sort of old Europe suit with thick pinned tie overdraped by a silk kimono, was in no way subdued. He relishes his status of bad boy in his bio and in his art. This work seems more pleasant to live with than his self-portrait in blood that inspired the Archbishop of Charleston to denounce Louis and to help him garner some serious attention both Good and Evil.
Painted Pony (Grande)
He is still a scavenger and an innovator. Several pieces in this show were drawn on linoleum tile that was pulled up from his studio floor. The textures and colors are so lovely and so appropriate that you do not think floor for even one second.
For more images of Louis’ work at Tyndall’s, go here, but better drop by the Gallery to appreciate the scale of the work.

UPDATE: Sylvia and Jane sent some pictures of the opening for is to enjoy.

17 Responses to “Louis St Lewis is a trouble-maker”
  1. karen nowell says:

    Hate that I could not be in Chapel Hill to enjoy and drool over Lewis’ latest works. I will say , though , that every day I wake up to “Angelique”, a piece he did a number of years ago. I would visit her daily (and nightly in the window of Gallery C in Raleigh), until he VERY genorously allowed me a layaway plan. She is a constant source for conversation for any and all that walk into my home, as is her smaller friend, a collage of Robes St Pierre. Thank you, Lewis!!!!!@

  2. please call me! i own an amazing eclectic gallery on king st. charleston! i actually know girl above karen nowell thru a friend! i am from nc; i graduated from unc-ch! i lived in nyc, atlanta, charlotte, and san francisco! 843-577-3636! the art is from america, russia, and france!

  3. Ron says:

    I know Lewis “from back in they day” (as the kids say) when he worked at Belk-Leggett at University Mall in Chapel Hill. He was the assistant to the person in charge of the displays (funny how that never seems to make it on his list of “accomplishments”). I enjoy reading his CV / biography from time to time to see what new direction his fictional life has taken him.

  4. Paul says:

    Speaking of Louis, there is an opening reception for his new show at Tyndall Galleries tonight (Saturday March 1, 2008) at 7 pm. Some of the new work here.

  5. James says:

    Louis St.Lewis is a bit on the wild side, but that is what makes him interesting. He refuses to ac like he is in North Carolina, and I find that very compelling. He is ambitious and has three solo shows this month, the Tyndall Gallery show, one at Craven Allen Gallery , and one at Crooks Corner.

  6. Miss Take (aka Sally Spark) says:

    Hi Ron! I worked at Belk during that time too. I always loved Louis’ crazy style, but I’d love to catch up with you. Drop me a line!

  7. Dorothy Gail says:

    I also know Louis, but even farther back than the Belk days you refer to…..I go back to High School and he was an acceptional
    person back then and would not trade one moment I had with him. I knew in my heart that Louis was going places and I was right.
    Way to go.

  8. Leake Little says:

    I’m impressed with his work – and since I am no expert that simply means that I like what I see. However, I’m not quite ready to have Louis staring back at me from his self-portraits. You see, in the race to see how far back we can trace the notorious Mr. St.Lewis I have a leg up – I knew him in grade school, and even played at his house when the drag strip was still operating. He was a feisty and creative soul even then, so I’m glad to see he’s still on the same path.

  9. Lanora Lewis Bayer says:

    One of the best artist in the world! He was a genius as a child when we played together with such imagination and even today a master at what he does. I am privileged to know such a wonderful person! Love ya Louis.

  10. kate says:

    I am australian, I accidently stumbled on louis st lewis’s writing its the most amusing and genuine work i’ve read in a LONG TIME,I felt i was sitting in the room with him speaking,i have the no attention span whatsoever but read three of his articles in a row, a true gift he has for subjective experience.

  11. elizabeth marin says:

    Wrote one of my best reviews ever…said my paintings were similar to a valium in a martini.
    Drink up and look at the new work.

  12. Paul says:

    Reviewing your own paintings, Elizabeth? I hope not entirely, I have an Elizabeth Marin painting in my house. I enjoy looking at it after only a small sip of warm whisky

  13. No Paul. I do not review my own paintings or those of others. Isimply paint. I am curious which piece of my soul you own that requires a drink before viewing. Perhaps it’s time for you to have one which appeased an intellectual and sober mind.
    And for the record this is the first time I have seen this site and I did not post the comment attributed to me. Hopefully I will find the person who gets off pretending to be me. The web fails to protect those who at times need such protection. How about a classroom debate on this problem.

    Sincerely,
    The authentic,
    Elizabeth Marin

  14. Elizabeth Marin says:

    Do you really need to insult me publicly because insulting my painting, “you can look at it only after sipping a warm whiskey “does just that. Not many van relate to ego-inflated humor. Feel free to discuss this further. I’m at 360 531 4349.

  15. Paul says:

    Prolly only a poorly constructed sentence on my part. I don’t need a martini with valium in it to enjoy your work. I’m happy with a small sip of whiskey. I enjoy the painting in many states of mind — most all of them sober and clear. Since you can see the context of my reply “Drink up and look at the new work,” you need not feel insulted (assuming this is the most real Elizabeth Marin so far).
    Peace out.

  16. Hi Paul. I suppose telling you that I AM the painter and mother Elizabeth Marin who at one time was blessed with a beautiful life and thereby, beautiful paintings. My expression of gratitude was to give back some of what I was given, to bring some beauty into an increasingly ugly world. Unlike the “Authentic” Elizabeth Marins post, I have absolutely no desire to know who has obsessively and methodically destroyed my professional and public life as well as my personal and private life _ anyone who has spent the past eight years nurturing obsessive psychotic abuse against my children, my self, and our lives has to be on the edge of something unthinkable. For I have nothing left, nothing, not even my identity. That too has been hijacked and defiled so I really don’t exist anymore, at least nwith little legitimacy. However, what I do have is both my children, my beautiful paintings and a much shattered but still intact integrity. Losing what is left would be unthinkable. I lack the means to defend myself Paul, and reading these latest posts, publicly attributed to being mine, as well as the many in other places, and the legal vendettas, and harrassment towards my children…this is frightening and accellerating, and infinite. it is the algorithmic orgasm of quantum ignorance. I am embarrassed that my Being somehow attracted and sustained such a destructive energy for so long. In closing, my phone numbers are 360 821 8600 and 360 379 2799. Feel free to post them and my e-mails, as they will provide some truth to this unbelievable mindfuck I live daily. echorneau@gmail.com echorneau@yahoo.com echorneau@outlook.com These are already known by those that do the doo doo so no worries.

    Take care Paul, enjoy my painting, and thank you for the chance to not turn from this latest incident with the despair that silences me more into the shadows.

    Elizabeth “majah” Marin

  17.  
Leave a Reply