Information hotlines

Call 211 for referrals

*Search for women's shelters*- add your city and state to this search

HUD's Homeless Outreach Information Center: 1.800.483.1010

HUD Community Connections 1.800.998.9999

HUD Housing Discrimination Hotline 1.800.669.9777

   
Women's Homeless Shelters

Information Resources for the Homeless

Shelters | Women | Food | Health | Jobs | Utilities | Research
 

cope200.jpg

Homeless Women

Women's homeless shelters

The best way to find a women's shelter is to call 211 for information in your area. Check here to see if 211 is active in your state. 

Search for women's shelters by city and state.

Type the name of your city and state at the top of the page before the word "women's".  Do not delete any of the words already there. This is the quickest and best way I have found to search for a women's shelter in a particular area.

A directory of women's shelters - click on the state, and then scroll all the way down.

 

YWCA - Find one near you

YWCA programs offer career counseling, sex education, support groups, shelters, breast cancer recovery groups, fitness classes, and more.

Affordable hotels: Youth hostels, further, information

 

Domestic violence / Battered women
 
 

Overview:

Domestic Violence from Mayo Clinic

If you are in immediate danger, call 911 right away.

Domestic Violence Hotline - 1.800.799.SAFE(7233)

Battered Women's Justice Project 1.800.903.0111

Resource Center on Child Protection and Custody 1.800.527.3223

Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence 1.800.313.1310

 

What if you are a friend of a battered woman?  What should you do?

 
 
 
Rape crisis information
 
 
You can call the National Sexual Assault Hotline,
operated by RAINN, 24 hours a day at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673), or you can search for your local rape crisis center.
 
Rape Crisis Information - Support groups and information about rape trauma syndrome.
 
Information for homeless families
 
 
 
 

Hotlines
 
1.800.799.SAFE (7233)    Domestic Violence Hotline
 
1.800.656.HOPE (4673)    Rape Crisis Hotline
 
1.800.DON'T.CUT (366.8288)  Self Injury            

1.800.SUICIDE (784.2433) Suicide Hotline

1.888.THE.GLNH (843.4564) Gay & Lesbian     

What to do first | Food | Identification cards | Shelters | Money | Jobs | Education | Veterans Information | Help for the homeless | Housing | Health | Disabilities | Substance abuse | Diversity among the homeless | Homeless Women | Released convicts | Transportation | Understanding the homeless | How to use the library

Research on ending homelessness in women 

Women are a rising statistic among the homeless population. Many women become homeless due to domestic violence. This points to a link between an ineffective criminal response system and the onset of female homelessness. In a study of 24 formerly homeless women in NY it was found that their time in shelters "paled in comparison to the epic and tragic nature of these women's ongoing difficulties... in fact for some women, experiences of the shelter system provided temporary respite from the harsher reality they faced prior to and/or following their shelter stay." (Styron et al 2000). The common themes among the women were poverty, neglect, abuse, troubled interpersonal relationships and mental health concerns. (Styron et al 2000). Many people ask of abused women "why don't they leave?" The answer: "For some women, their escape means long durations of unacceptable living conditions or homelessness. According to shelter statistics, the wait for subsidized housing is anywhere from 3 weeks to 5 years (sic) despite the existence of a special priority for placement for victims of abuse." (Sev'er 2002) The fear of homelessness locks many women into abusive relationships.  

Bibliography on homeless women

Research on homeless families

 
Emergency shelters, transitional housing, and battered women's shelters

Data Collection Project Twelfth Annual Report 2003

"A significant number of the women had moved as many as six times within the past five years for various reasons, including domestic violence, interpersonal conflict, overcrowding, and eviction. Identified needs included housing, food, clothing, and
transportation. The needs of homeless women and their children were different from the needs of the homeless chronically mentally ill and require specialized services as well as an increase in the available number of lowincome housing units (authors)." Authors: Khanna, M., Singh, N.N., Nemil, M., Best, A., Ellis, C.R. Title: Homeless Women and Their Families: Characteristics, Life Circumstances, and Needs. Source: Journal of Child and Family Studies 1(2): 155-165, 1992. (Journal Article: 11 pages)

'This article analyzes both homeless shelters and battered women's shelters in Phoenix, Az., and points to the striking similarities in reasons for seeking emergency housing in both types of shelters. Specifically women discuss similarly impoverished circumstances and often indicate that their past histories include abusive partners. Partly, the similarity in these stories can be traced to overlapping populations of the two types of
shelters. Women may enter a homeless shelter after spending thirty days in a battered women's shelter, and some may enter homeless shelters instead of battered women's shelters due to availability, later curfews, and a variety of other reasons. The author concludes that the overlap in populations and the similarities among women's stories suggest a complex connection between battering and homelessness (author)." Authors: Williams, J.C. Title: Domestic Violence and Poverty: The Narratives of Homeless Women. Source: Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 19(2): 143-165, 1998. (Journal Article: 23 pages)


"Much of the literature on homelessness never mentions woman battering as a cause of homelessness. The United States Conference of Mayors listed lack of affordable housing, mental illness, unemployment, poverty or the lack of income, and inadequate benefit levels in public assistance programs as the causes of homelessness
in American cities. Studies of homeless women and families traditionally exclude battered women's shelters, presumably because their residents are unrepresentative of the homeless. However, the reality is that battered women and their children comprise a significant proportion of occupants of homeless shelters. This articles examines conflicting theories of causes of homelessness, the extent and cost of abuse to women, the effects of battering on children and proposals to minimize homelessness among battered women (author). Authors: Zorza, J. Title: Woman Battering: A Major Cause of Homelessness. Source: Clearinghouse Review Special Issue: 412-429, 1991. (Journal Article: 10 pages)

Don't lose hope. When it gets darkest the stars come out.
-- Unknown.

 
Hope is the only bee that makes honey without flowers.
-- Robert Ingersoll.

"Not so long ago, women and children were rare at rescue missions and shelters. How times have changed! Today, homeless women with children are more common than ever. According to some estimates, between 70% and 90% of homeless families in America are headed by women. Even more significant, the population of homeless families has increased by 35% since 1989."

From helpforwomen

 

 

 

 
The author reserves the right not to be responsible for the topicality, correctness, completeness or quality of the information provided. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected.
All offers are not-binding and without obligation. Parts of the pages or the complete publication including all offers and information might be extended, changed or partly or completely deleted by the author without separate announcement.


 

 

 
 
 

 

The author reserves the right not to be responsible for the topicality, correctness, completeness or quality of the information provided. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected.
All offers are not-binding and without obligation. Parts of the pages or the complete publication including all offers and information might be extended, changed or partly or completely deleted by the author without separate announcement.


This search will lead you to resources related to the subject of this site.