first three principal parts of 'I depart'

Grammar questions which are not related to any specific text.

Re: first three principal parts of 'I depart'

Postby Tony Pope » July 1st, 2013, 5:44 am

RandallButh wrote:So in the Mophologia booklet, we have a table for ὑπάγειν ᾽to be going away'. But in the aorist column and the future column is a note "lacking, use ἀπελθεῖν". As the example passage for this verb, the applicable words from Luke 19:30-32 are quoted, so that the user can see the word used correctly.


You could also cite Matt 9.6 and 7, where the goal of the motion is explicit in both sentences:

6 ... ἐγερθεὶς ἀρόν σου τὴν κλίνην καὶ ὕπαγε εἰς τὸν οἶκόν σου. 7 καὶ ἐγερθεὶς ἀπῆλθεν εἰς τὸν οἶκον αὐτοῦ.
Tony Pope
 
Posts: 47
Joined: July 14th, 2011, 6:20 pm

Re: first three principal parts of 'I depart'

Postby RandallButh » July 1st, 2013, 9:21 am

Tony Pope wrote:
RandallButh wrote:So in the Mophologia booklet, we have a table for ὑπάγειν ᾽to be going away'. But in the aorist column and the future column is a note "lacking, use ἀπελθεῖν". As the example passage for this verb, the applicable words from Luke 19:30-32 are quoted, so that the user can see the word used correctly.


You could also cite Matt 9.6 and 7, where the goal of the motion is explicit in both sentences:

6 ... ἐγερθεὶς ἀρόν σου τὴν κλίνην καὶ ὕπαγε εἰς τὸν οἶκόν σου. 7 καὶ ἐγερθεὶς ἀπῆλθεν εἰς τὸν οἶκον αὐτοῦ.


Thank you, Tony. I think I like that example with identical objects, so I've added it. There was space on the page and two examples help to establish to connection between ὑπάγειν and ἁπελθεῖν. Normally a table only has one example. The purpose of the tables is not define lexical data or even to learn a word's meaning(s), but to clarify the forms for the most common couple hundred 'funky verbs', which turn out to be the language's favorites. This is able to flag most of the potholes in the road.

There is now a second table related to ὑπάγειν and the example is from Josephus, as may be expected:
ὑπαγαγέσθαι to subdue τινα, bring under (control), lead away* ὑπάγεσθαι to be subduing, bringing under (control)
(columns for content of various forms and tenses and moods), then:
*less commonly used in active: ὑπάγαγεῖν ὑπάγειν to lead into control, lead away, with a passive: ὑπαχθῆναι to be subdued, brought under control
Ιωσήπου Αρχ. ζ´ 307 δυνατοὶ γὰρ ἦσαν οὗτοι καὶ χώραν ὑπάγεσθαι καὶ μεγάλων ἐθνῶν κρατῆσαι..
For these were able to be subduing territory and to take control of great nations.

Naturally, the formatting is not reflected above. Moods include imperative, other infinitives, indicatives, subjunctive, optative, and participles, packed on half a page. As mentioned, only one functional voice to a table (so ἐλθεῖν ἔρχεσθαι ἐληλυθέναι and ἐλεύσεσθαι are in one table). (Duals are not included in individual tables, but one page covers them generically at the end of the verbs, just so a user has access to the info.)
RandallButh
 
Posts: 562
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: first three principal parts of 'I depart'

Postby RandallButh » July 1st, 2013, 1:36 pm

PS: with a second table for ὑπαγαγέσθαι, we now have a different note under
ὑπάγειν
(This verb is idiomatic as ‘going away, departing’ and is not used in the ἀόριστος or μέλλων. For those tenses use ἀπελθεῖν ἀπελεύσεσθαι. Another meaning of the verb root ὑπαγαγεῖν, older though less common, is 'subdue, lead something away'. See ὑπαγαγέσθαι.)
RandallButh
 
Posts: 562
Joined: May 13th, 2011, 4:01 am

Re: first three principal parts of 'I depart'

Postby Orrin Winton » July 7th, 2013, 9:35 pm

Thank you all for responding. I am taking notes on the parts of the discussion I will be able to use at this point in my studies.
Orrin Winton
 
Posts: 7
Joined: May 25th, 2013, 8:09 pm

Previous

Return to Grammar Questions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests