Archive for the “#noemail” Category

This past two weeks brought to my attention four challengers to email overload and a promise of more #noemail alternatives. The three applications, like many emerging alternatives, attempt to include mobile friendliness, terse messaging (sometimes with stickers or visuals), highly interactive communication and context appropriateness.

Charleston SC’s Post-Courier interviews Twitpics founder, Noah Everett, as he challenges email with Pingly. Okay not so much challenges as offers a delay of sorts. Pingly is said to come “from the phrase ‘Ping me’ (send me an email later.)” And in a display of tortured syntax: “We’re building basically from the ground up a brand new email service.” If someone is on your Pingly whitelist, their messages get marked as important. Despite the hype, Pingly is really an interactive whitelist management system for your inbox. Not #noemail.

Meanwhile, TechCrunch’s MG Siegler aka @parislemon, who himself did a brief #noemail stint, looks at signals from Twitter about extending their DM feature as an email killer. Siegler promises or predicts only a maiming of email in his title, but he opines and predicts and wishes from much more. I do too. DMs are one of my favorite features of Twitter, a back channel to the public Tweet Stream (as Siegler also notes and loves). An additional shared passion we share is for the forced terseness of Twitter communications: “But wait, Twitter DMs are only 140 characters, that will never work! In the context of email, that would very much be a feature not a bug.” But remember this article isn’t about what is now available so much as a wish list for Twitter developers.

I haven’t yet tested, Slack, which The Verge hypes as an email killer in an interview with founder Stewart Butterfield. Butterfield, himself has been #noemail for over 4 years (he says), so we can expect some insight here as well as a working product. Slack was developed, not coincidentally, about 4 years ago as a chat tool for Massive Multiuser Online games (MMO) — where terseness, interactivity, whitelists, and context control are essential. So far so good. Even better, Slack integrates communications across applications. As Butterfield says “It’s all your communication in one place, instantly searchable, and available wherever you go” or in market-speak “It’s a messaging and search platform that creates a single unified archive accessible through powerful search.” Despite the promise of #noemail, Butterfield hedges his bets by offering to integrate email into Slack in the future. In doing so, he repositions Slack from an email killer or an alternative communications integration play. The sort of Swiss Army Knife with too many specialized blades to fit into your pocket.


Vergers talk about Slack mostly loving the search but also talking about teams using Slack. And rightly dissing email.

Washington Post writer, Brigid Schulte, gets to Mailbox Zero and tells you how. Like getting into Carnegie Hall: practice, practice, practice. Well, a little more that that. Schulte proposes a set of practices that will, if followed with discipline, at least reduce your inbox size if not enhance your life. If you are anxious enough to be disciplined. What we know about people, just look at your desk clutter for a second, is that more than a few of us have that kind of self-discipline. And we look askant at those who do, seeing them as OCD or just anal. Not that Schulte’s practices are bad ones. They are very good. But they are also just simple common sense productivity practices whether in regards to email or to any other business task that can overwhelm you.

Why not just go nuclear on the Inbox at the corporate level as the German giant Daimler has done with their employees by promising to have all incoming emails received while on vacation deleted so not return to bulging inbox as reported in Financial Times (registration required)? [precis of the article here at The Atlantic without blockage].

Comments 3 Comments »

This past two days, I’ve been a bit split–talking about keeping yourself and your sources secret on one day then on how you should share knowledge (without email) the next night.

On Friday, I spoke about Tor and how it can be used (correctly) by journalists at the Reese News Lab.

And on Saturday, I gave the Robert Ballard Lecture for the Carolinas Chapter of the American Association for Information Science and Technology on #noemail. The #noemail talk is a completely updated version focusing on why email will be replaced (largely) by social and sharing, how this is already happening and what factors are driving that change.

Comments No Comments »

On January 30, Luis “elsua” Suarez visited our UNC School of Information and Library Science senior capstone course on Emerging Issues and Technologies to talk with us about his 6+ years without email while at IBM.

Luis brought a lot of good insight to the class as he did a Google Hangout with us from his home on Gran Canaria. Luis lives in Africa, reports in Europe and works most closely with a team in North America — without using email.

Near the end of his talk, he told us a little — very little — about his new adventure which was to start only a few days later. Luis is a charter member of Change Agents Worldwide.

Luis, who was extremely generous to spend time with us during his transition, will be moving from being a Change Agent within a very large global and hierarchical organization to advising and assisting organizations of all sizes to work better by learning about Social Business practices.

Luis has been a global presence already as has been noted in Wired, New York Times, and at Outside The Inbox dot EU (among others). His experience and personal engagement will definitely be a leader and advisor to call on.

Working with Luis has taught me not to look for the smartest person in the room but to look for the smartest network that has someone in the room with you.

Looking forward to his and CAWW’s future adventures.

Comments 1 Comment »

Tis the season for email scams and hacks and trojans. As the holidays go into full swing, you suddenly find that “You Are A Winner!” or “Reset your password here” or the most evil of all “Someone changed your password — login to confirm or reset.”

This last works not just with email but with Facebook and other services as well. It may arrive via txt, FB message but usually via email. Bill Hayes writes somewhat forgivingly of his experience with the human engineered phishing of his friends by his compromised Gmail account in today’s New York Times, “Thank You for Hacking Me”

Not to take the fun out of the story, but one upside is that Hayes lost 9,187 items from his Gmail inbox. Clearly he needs better email management — and #noemail.

Last month a friend of mine had her Facebook account cloned. The new account immediately began friending all of the real person’s friends. As soon as you were friended, the phishing began.

I returned the friend request to see what was up. Soon I got a “Hello Message” then I decided to have fun:

[fake friend] Hello

[me] hello [friend's name]. Maybe you can help me
I think I left a wallet at your house [I have never been to her house]

[ff] I will check it out and get back to you

[me] maybe under the coffee table

[ff] Ok

[me] near the red chair
It has some very important papers in it
on the subject we were talking about

[ff] Ok

[me] I can’t say much about that here obviously
But there is a lot at stake

[ff] Ok

[me] be very casual while you are looking

[ff] ok

[me] this is very important. you know the chair i’m talking about?
[Chat Conversation End]

Of course I reported the false account just after. And it was soon gone.

Comments Comments Off

Business Practices That Refuse To Die (but should) via Kevin D. Jones of Decog Yourself

Thanks to Sebastian Schäfer

Comments No Comments »

From Germany, Harald Schirmer explains how email causes pain which blogging can abate. Click on the image for his full contribution and full explanation. Very well done. Blogs vs Email

Comments No Comments »

Reconnections with two old friends with #noemail connections this morning.

First Paul Gilster writes about not being able to go #noemail in the News & Observer. He has nice things to say (and mentions me and the #noemail life I’m leading), but as I comment:

Paul,
Why be negative?
it’s not quitting email, it’s communicating in better ways. #noemail is saying “I’m here but I don’t live at my desk” “I’m social when more appropriate” “Say it quickly and be direct” “Less covering your rear at work by CCing your boss at every move; work it out your self” “More sharing” and in the end a richer life.
As for email, it was adequate for the needs of the late 20th Century.
We don’t live there any more.
Peace out,
Paul

Paul is doing great work about space travel at Centauri Dreams. Perhaps he’s seen ibiblio – the movie.

Second, my ole pal and running buddy, Tom Wilkinson, who does no email and no social media is featured in Charlotte Magazine telling his tall — but also true — tales in “The Entertainer: the Backstage Live of Tom Wilkinson.” No page can contain Tom’s talking and animated presentation, but this is a good tribute and a good primer. Email could not do him justice, but maybe YouTube or Vimeo could.

Tom WIlkinson in Charlotte Magazine Credit Logan Cyrus

Comments No Comments »

I had a great time this Monday at the RTP Foundation taking part in 5 minute talks on open source projects called “RTP 180: Open Source All Things.” While I talked — slightly over my 5 minutes, I’ll admit — just over 60 slides representing about 1% of the projects currently hosted at ibiblio.org passed by on the screen at about 3 seconds each. That could have been a little fast for some people, so I’ve reposted those slides here:

On Wednesday, I took the #noemail message to the Duke Libraries as “Imagine Life without Email” where one former ibiblian and current Duke Libraires developer taunted me by sending an email in my presence with not one but two attachments. Will is, of course, the source of his own pain as Oscar Wilde observed “We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell.”

Slides from that talk are here (note that Is Good doesn’t trust Google Docs but I assure you this link is fine):

Comments No Comments »

Preferred Chat System from XKCD

Comments No Comments »

MIT’s Daniel Smilkov, Deepak Jagdish, and César Hidalgo have created a great Gmail metadata visualization tool called Immersion. The first thing that Immersion does is map your email interaction networks in a nice interactive way. You can see networks emerge, strength of ties (via number of interactions), isolated mail bombers (usually listservs or alerts), and relationships easily and beautifully.

For me this is particularly nice as you can control the time periods that are mapped. So I mapped my email interactions for the three years before I quit email, then the two years after having stopped doing email, finally the past month of #noemail (this past month).

Mail networks pre-#noemail (3 years)

Mail networks pre-#noemail (3 years)

Mail networks since practicing #noemail (2 years)

Mail networks since practicing #noemail (2 years)

Mail Networks in the past month #noemail (June 2013)

Mail Networks in the past month #noemail (June 2013)

Comments No Comments »

I”m delighted that the slide deck from our webinar made it into a blog post by Luis Suarez called Meet Your New CEO; Your Kid.

Luis recounts some of his motivations for beginning to Live A Life Without Email over five years ago. The speculates about our futures at work, at home and in the world. Looking at our kids is a good way to learn the ways of an evolving world — even if one lesson is to start forgetting what you’ve always found useful and helpful.

Luis includes this video of kids evaluating their current social media (SnapChat, Tumblr, and Whisper.sh are not mentioned)

Be sure to read his post.

Comments No Comments »

Yesterday, Luis Suarez (IBM Europe), Robert Shaw (Blue Kiwi & ATOS) and I did a webinar for the Information Overload Research Group on “How can business survive without e-mail at all?”

The webinar is captured here by Charlie Davidson of Attensa (and IORG). Nice moderation was provided by Marty Bariff of Illinois Institute of Technology.

The slides I created for my part of the talk are here:



Comments 1 Comment »

Luis Suarez (not the European footballer but the one of IBM Europe fame) has started a Google + Community for Living a Life Without Email moderated by Paul Lancaster (Sage UK), Alan Hamilton (Social business evangelist, IBM UK) and myself.

Join us for more #noemail insights with a global and social business twist and look for #lawwe (Living A World Without eMail) and #noemail on most social networking sites.

Comments No Comments »

The UNC University Gazette did a nice cover story about “Beyond e-mail: the constantly changing realm of communication” which focused largely on #nomail as a future for communications as the title suggests. I give appropriate credit to the Magic School Bus’ Miss Frizzle as my inspiration.

Dan Sears had fun taking this picture for the top of the story:
Paul Jones by Dan Sears

Comments No Comments »

Paul Lancaster of Sage (UK) aka @lordlancaster, Luis Suarez of IBM Spain (joining the Hangout from the Canary Islands) and I did a Google Hangout to discuss International #noemailday, #noemail and #lawwe (Living in A World Without Email). Good to chat with my international #noemail friends about what we do (and don’t do), how we’ve done it, and what we encourage others to do (and not do).

Comments No Comments »

Gideon Lichfield writing in Quartz notes: You are wasting your time on email. Now more than ever. Quit! Average email reply time in 2012 went up to 2.5 Days from 2.2 days in 2011. (according to Cue.com which also notes that dogs are mentioned more often than cats in corporate email. 38% vs 32%).

Wasted time waiting for email replies

Wasted time waiting for email replies

The forward thinking Lichfield also observes:

On current trends, then, if email response times keep increasing by 10% a year, and assuming that an average postal delivery time in your country is two days, I estimate that by approximately 2020 it will be faster to get an answer from someone by writing a letter than by sending an email.

(his bold statement)

Be ahead of the pack; begin with #noemail today (really you should give some announcement beforehand. See suggestions throughout this blog for how to quit with grace).

Comments No Comments »

No Email Day
Tomorrow 12/12/12 is No Mail Day. The second No Email Day. The first was 11/11/11. The idea is to try to go 24 hours without email. What to use in its place? Most anything else from F2F, Phone, txt, social media or smoke signals.

Here are several #noemail stories to keep you warm as we approach the Day. Turn up the gas log fire. Burn a few pixels. Relax. As Mother Jones said: “Sit down and read. Educate yourself for the coming conflicts.”

BaseLine presents a report in the dreaded slide show format called “Workers Can’t (or Won’t) Escape From Their eMail”.

The BaseLine report is a retelling of the Minecast reports filed under “The Shape of Email” .

The first report “What Mimecast knows about email” looks at the inboxes of corporate email users in a handy interactive infographic format. Mimecast is unique in that they survey users in the US, UK and South Africa. Some small differences there to be seen.

The second report “What end users think” looks at user opinions and deceptions. For example, 25% of those surveyed say that they sent emails late at night from home in order to show their commitment to their jobs. 57% reported spending over half their work day on email (27% spent writing; 30% spent reading).

A third report or infographic looks at “What IT Professionals Think” about their email. Only 30% of IT professionals delete mail from their archives. 64% fear that social media poses a security risk. Only 1 in 5 or 20% believe that social media has an impact on email use.

Not exactly social or #noemail related, well perhaps indirectly related: The Pew Research Center’s Excellence in Journalism Project released a new report on the “Demographics of Mobile News” . The data represented by Poynter shows a significant change in device use from smartphone to tablet at about age 50 (more granularity of data would be helpful in understanding the points and trends of change). One simple explanation, that I’ve been giving out at my recent talks, is that this is exactly the age that our eyes begin to change. When we need, but resist bifocals. When the print is just too damn small!. The rise of tablets will hasten the death of email among the group most resistant to change — men over 50.

Tomorrow, enjoy #noemail on No Email Day.

Smartphone vs Tablet

Comments No Comments »

Kind of an old story from Linda Stone — originally 2008 at O’Reilly’s Radar and at Huffington Post then revisited on her Attention Project in 2009 –, but just covered by Business Insider today. Linda Stone documents her own case of email apnea or holding your breath while reading email. Stone followed up her experience with broader research to discover that “80% of the people appeared to have email apnea—in other words, they held their breath or otherwise interrupted normal breathing.”

Also noticed by Business Insider : Gloria J. Mark and Stephen Voida of University of California, Irvine’s Department of Informatics with Armand V. Cardello of U.S. Army Natick Soldier R, D & E Center warn us “There will always be new “zombies” lurking with advances in information technology” in their 2012 paper “A Pace Not Dictated by Electrons: An Empirical Study of Work Without Email” [PDF].

Don’t be a Zombie. Breathe easy. Om Om #noemail

Comments No Comments »

mmmmail
Just learned of a nice anonymous & disposable email to RSS tool called mmmmail. mmmmail says “you can choose any email address in the mmmmail.com domain and use it at your own will. All email sent to this email address of your choice can then be retrieved as an RSS feed.” A very nice way to collect and manage activity streams from various lists or even people that you’d like to read in an organized way. Simple; the way I like it.

Yammer
Yammer, the great corporate IM service/product, was bought by Microsoft this summer for $1.2Billion(US). Many of us wondered if Yammer could survive or would be simply left alone (more or less like Skype). s it turns out Yammer looks to be a source for not only changes to Microsoft products — to be integrated with Skype it’s rumored into a new Office Suite in the sky –, but also as a corporate culture changer for the Redmond giant itself. Microsoft could undergo a change from email culture to IM culture as IBM did famously over a decade ago. This is not just about Yammer as a communications tool though. PC World reports that Yammer’s quick incremental release culture is being touted as a culture changer for developers. “Specifically, Microsoft sees great value in the way Yammer introduces weekly changes and new features to its cloud-hosted suite and then closely monitors their usage to determine if they are useful to customers.”

Comments No Comments »

NCREN Big Think
I’ll be speaking at the North Carolina Research and Education Network Community Day on Thursday November 15 at Elon University.

I offered a poll to NCREN attendees on which they could vote on the topic about which I would speak. The clear winner: #noemail.

Fired Up and Ready To Go

Comments No Comments »